Photos of thousands of people who got naked on iconic Bondi Beach for a nude shoot to raise skin cancer awareness




Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot
Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot  
  • Spencer Tunick's latest art installation saw 2,500 naked people take to Bondi Beach on Saturday.

  • The Guardian reported that the photo shoot was to raise awareness of skin cancer.

  • One naked model told The Guardian the experience was "freezing" but also "empowering."

Two thousand five hundred naked people filled Bondi Beach, one of Australia's most iconic landmarks, on Saturday morning in the name of Spencer Tunick's latest art installation.

The photo shoot was to raise awareness of skin cancer, with the 2,500-person crowd representing the number of Australians who die from the disease each year, The Guardian reported.

According to the outlet, Tunick hopes to encourage regular skin checks among Australians.

"Skin unites us and protects us," he told The Guardian. "I use the amazing array of body types and skin tones to create my work, so it feels perfectly appropriate to take part in this effort in that my medium is the nude human form."

Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot
Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot  

The artist used a megaphone to instruct the crowd during the shoot, as per The Guardian. "Put your arms out when you're posing," he called. "Don't get naked yet."

Tunick had the group pose in several different configurations before some took a morning dip in the sea, The Print added.

Nudity is usually banned on the beach, but special legislation was implemented to allow the photo shoot. Those taking part had to be fully clothed by 10 a.m. to avoid a fine, according to The Guardian.

Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot
Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot  

Tamera Francis wrote about taking part in the shoot for The Sydney Morning Herald: "If I can be part of something that prevents unnecessary deaths, I will. Even if that means freezing off what little tatas I have and dealing with the logistical nightmare that is herding thousands of uncaffeinated naked people," she penned.

"If I could have prevented my dad's and my nan's fatal cancer diagnoses with something as simple as a skin check or wearing sunscreen every day, I would," she added.

Another naked model, Sarah Bowen, told the Guardian that her sister and father had survived melanoma.

On her experience of the nude shoot, she said: "It was freezing, but also empowering to be with so many people supporting the cause and also just being like naked and seeing so many different people and shapes and sizes. Everyone just being comfortable being naked. It was wonderful."

Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot
Group of nude people on Bondi Beach for cancer awareness photo shoot  

Tunick is no stranger to a naked photo shoot. Back in 2010, he gathered 5,000 nude Australians in front of the Sydney Opera House in celebration of Sydney's Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, Reuters previously reported.

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