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Flu hospitalization rate nearly doubled during Thanksgiving week, CDC reports
Flu hospitalization rate nearly doubled during Thanksgiving week, CDC reports

CDC flu report shows the U.S. is in the midst of one of the earliest and most virulent influenza seasons on record. Hospitalizations for flu doubled during Thanksgiving week.

U.K. officials issue warning after 6 children die of Strep A infections
U.K. officials issue warning after 6 children die of Strep A infections

Health officials have seen higher numbers of cases caused by Group A streptococci, bacteria that can cause respiratory and skin infections including strep throat, impetigo and scarlet fever.

US plans end to mpox public health emergency in January
US plans end to mpox public health emergency in January

The federal government plans to end in January the public health emergency it declared earlier this year after an outbreak of mpox infected more than 29,000 people across the U.S. Mpox cases have plummeted in recent weeks, with just a handful of new infections being reported every week in the month of November, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The public health emergency is expected to end in January, said Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra in a statement.

United States to end mpox emergency declaration
United States to end mpox emergency declaration

The months-long declaration was meant to tackle the largest-ever outbreak of cases in the country. The move signals that the crisis, which led to a spate of cases mostly among men who have sex with men, has come under control and would no longer require an emergency status meant to shore up funding and tools to fight the disease. "Given the low number of cases today, HHS does not expect that it needs to renew the emergency declaration when it ends on January 31, 2023," U.S. Health Secretary Xavier Becerra said in a statement on Friday.

Flu season worsens as 44 states report high activity
Flu season worsens as 44 states report high activity

Health officials said Friday that 7.5% of outpatient medical visits last week were due to flu-like illnesses. The annual winter flu season usually doesn't get going until December or January, but this one began early and has been complicated by the simultaneous spread of other viruses. Other years also didn't have this year's unusually strong wave of RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, a common cause of cold-like symptoms that can be serious for infants and the elderly.

Deaths From Substance Abuse Rose Sharply Among Older Americans in 2020
Deaths From Substance Abuse Rose Sharply Among Older Americans in 2020

Deaths due to substance abuse, particularly of alcohol and opioids, rose sharply among older Americans in 2020, the first year of the coronavirus pandemic, as lockdowns disrupted routines and isolation and fear spread, federal health researchers reported Wednesday. Alcohol and opioid deaths remained far less common among older people than among those middle-aged and younger, and rates had been rising in all groups for years. But the pronounced uptick - another data point in the long list of pand

An influencer wanted a
An influencer wanted a 'Brazilian butt lift.' She ended up at the hospital 'covered in blood.'

Rachel Velasco remembers walking into the emergency room at Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles last year "screaming and covered in blood" at 3 a.m.

Nurses
Nurses' attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination for their children are highly influenced by partisanship, a new study finds

As of Nov. 30, 2022, 62.5% of children and adolescents are unvaccinated against COVID-19. South_agency/E+ via Getty ImagesThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work. The big idea Children of nurses who identify as Republican are less likely to receive a COVID-19 vaccination compared with children of nurses who identify as Democrat, according to our recently published study in the Journal of Community Health. We surveyed more than 1,000 nurses in South Dakota in June and J

The more pandemic precautions fall away, the more COVID risk is concentrated on this one group
The more pandemic precautions fall away, the more COVID risk is concentrated on this one group

When everyone around them stops taking pandemic precautions, it gets harder for immunocompromised Americans to protect themselves against COVID.

Children of color are less likely to undergo elective surgery. What does this mean?
Children of color are less likely to undergo elective surgery. What does this mean?

The research shows children of color could be suffering amid delays in important surgical interventions, experts say.

New documentary shows how maternal health crisis disproportionately hits Black women
New documentary shows how maternal health crisis disproportionately hits Black women

Story at a glance The documentary, Birthing Justice, centers on the experiences of Black women and families as they navigate the joys and fears of being pregnant. The project, along with the work of Black women across the country, is the chance for people to listen to Black women and come together to create better…

Chinese cities ease COVID curbs as virus keeps spreading
Chinese cities ease COVID curbs as virus keeps spreading

BEIJING (Reuters) -Some communities in Chinese cities where COVID-19 is still spreading are easing off on testing requirements and quarantine rules ahead of an expected shift in virus policies nationwide after widespread social unrest. The uneven relaxation of COVID restrictions is, however, fuelling fear among some residents who suddenly feel more exposed to a disease authorities had consistently described as deadly until this week. Pharmacies in Beijing say purchases of N95 masks, which offer a much higher degree of protection than the single-use surgical type, have gone up this week.

"Music is their language": school gives autistic Chinese youth a voice
"Music is their language": school gives autistic Chinese youth a voice

Almost three years of pandemic restrictions have been hard for 23-year-old Chinese villager Zu Wenbao, but thanks to Beijing-based Chen's Studio, music has become his saving grace. Zu is one of the 14 million people in China who have autism spectrum disorder, a developmental disability caused by differences in the brain. Despite laws to ensure the integration of people with autism, many in China know little about the disorder and support remains lacking, experts say.

U.S. FDA declines to approve Y-mAbs
U.S. FDA declines to approve Y-mAbs's pediatric cancer drug

Y-mAbs said it is assessing the implications of the Food and Drug Administration's complete response letter (CRL) and the company's plans for the drug's development program. The FDA's decision follows a unanimous vote by its advisers in October against the drug, omburtamab, to treat neuroblastoma due to insufficient evidence that it improves overall survival. "We are disappointed but not surprised based on the outcome of the (FDA advisory panel) meeting," interim Chief Executive Officer Thomas Gad said in a statement.

U.S. FDA approves Rigel Pharma
U.S. FDA approves Rigel Pharma's treatment for a type of leukemia

The Food and Drug Administration approved the drug, which will be sold under the brand Rezlidhia, for the treatment of a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow called acute myeloid leukemia in patients with a susceptible genetic mutation. Approval for the oral drug was supported by data from the company's mid-stage study, which showed a 35% rate for complete remission of the cancer with a complete or partial recovery in blood count. Rezlidhia will be the company's second treatment to get approval from the FDA after Tavalisse for a rare bleeding disorder called immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

Yale sued over
Yale sued over 'systemic discrimination' against students with mental health disabilities

Yale University is being sued over what students say is "systemic discrimination" against students with mental health disabilities.

Children
Children's clothing recalled for lead paint

Bentex manufactured several top and legging or short sets that feature nine different characters, including Minnie Mouse and Baby Yoda.

Minnesota nurses vote to strike for 2nd time this year
Minnesota nurses vote to strike for 2nd time this year

The planned strike, which was voted on with "overwhelming" support from the 15,000 nurses in the Minnesota Nurses Association, will begin on Dec. 11 and could last until Dec. 31.

Al Roker hospitalized again due to "complications" after being treated for blood clots
Al Roker hospitalized again due to "complications" after being treated for blood clots

"He's resting and his doctors are keeping a close eye on him," "Today" co-host Hoda Kotb said of Roker.

'TODAY' show's Al Roker returns to hospital after treatment for blood clots

"TODAY" show weatherman and anchor Al Roker has been readmitted to the hospital after revealing last month that he was treated for blood clots.

Fatherhood changes men
Fatherhood changes men's brains, according to before-and-after MRI scans

Fathers' brains adjust their structure and function to parenthood María Paternina-Die, CC BY-NDThe time fathers devote to child care every week has tripled over the past 50 years in the United States. The increase in fathers' involvement in child rearing is even steeper in countries that have expanded paid paternity leave or created incentives for fathers to take leave, such as Germany, Spain, Sweden and Iceland. And a growing body of research finds that children with engaged fathers do better o

Twitter lifted its ban on COVID misinformation - research shows this is a grave risk to public health
Twitter lifted its ban on COVID misinformation - research shows this is a grave risk to public health

The restraints on COVID-19 misinformation on Twitter are off. AP Photo/Jeff ChiuTwitter's decision to no longer enforce its COVID-19 misinformation policy, quietly posted on the site's rules page and listed as effective Nov. 23, 2022, has researchers and experts in public health seriously concerned about the possible repercussions. Health misinformation is not new. A classic case is the misinformation about a purported but now disproven link between autism and the MMR vaccine based on a discredi

How parents can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of teen mental health problems
How parents can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of teen mental health problems

Early detection is key to treating depression in teenagers. dragana991/iStock via Getty Images PlusMore than 44% of teens reported persistent feelings of sadness and hopelessness in the first half of 2021, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The early 2022 report, which was based on an online survey, also found that nearly 20% had seriously considered suicide, and 9% attempted suicide. The COVID-19 pandemic is a likely contributor to these startling figures

Yale University sued over discriminating against students with mental health disabilities
Yale University sued over discriminating against students with mental health disabilities

Students of Yale University sued the university Wednesday, accusing the school of discriminating against students with mental health disabilities.

Use of drugs for weight loss causes supply shortage
Use of drugs for weight loss causes supply shortage

Dramatic stories about weight loss using popular drugs are trending on social media. People who need the drugs for other health issues now face shortages.

Jargon alert: How doctors speak could cause
Jargon alert: How doctors speak could cause 'harm' for patients

Medical terms used by some doctors to describe cancer tumors or X-rays could be confusing to patients, a new survey finds.

FDA likely to end blanket ban on sexually active gay men donating blood
FDA likely to end blanket ban on sexually active gay men donating blood

Under current federal rules, men cannot donate blood if they have had sex with another man in the last three months.

FDA clears 1st fecal transplant treatment for gut infection
FDA clears 1st fecal transplant treatment for gut infection

U.S. officials have approved the first pharmaceutical-grade version of the so-called fecal transplant procedures that doctors have increasingly used against hard-to-treat intestinal infections. The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Rebyota for adults who have trouble fighting off infections with Clostridium difficile, commonly referred to as C. diff, a bacteria that causes nausea, cramping and diarrhea. For more than a decade, some U.S. doctors have used stool samples from healthy donors to treat the condition.

Driving simulator helps teens with ADHD keep eyes on the road - study
Driving simulator helps teens with ADHD keep eyes on the road - study

A computer simulation program for teen drivers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) helped them learn to keep their eyes on the road and resulted in fewer accidents or near collisions for a group at particularly high-risk when behind the wheel, according to a study published on Wednesday. By providing feedback when teens looked away from the road for two seconds or more, the training reduced the frequency of these long glances and lessened variations in lane position, researchers reported in The New England Journal of Medicine. In the year afterward, the 76 teens randomly assigned to receive the training had fewer collisions and near-collisions than a control group of 76...

Fact check: False claim FTX funded research into ivermectin as a COVID-19 treatment
Fact check: False claim FTX funded research into ivermectin as a COVID-19 treatment

TOGETHER Trial's study of using ivermectin as a COVID-19 treatment came before FTX was a financial sponsor of the consortium's research.

Eisai, Biogen Alzheimer
Eisai, Biogen Alzheimer's drug could be available to some next year

Japan's Eisai Co plans to seek full approval of its experimental Alzheimer's drug lecanemab in the United States, Europe and Japan armed with data showing it can slow the brain-wasting disease for people with early symptoms, potentially getting the treatment to patients next year. It remains unclear how widely the drug developed with U.S. biotech Biogen Inc will be used due to uncertainty over insurance coverage, including the U.S. government's Medicare plan for people age 65 and over, potential side effects and cost.

Yale University sued over student mental health policies
Yale University sued over student mental health policies

Yale University is accused in a federal lawsuit filed Wednesday of discriminating against students with mental health disabilities, including pressuring some to withdraw from the prestigious institution and then placing "unreasonable burdens" on those who seek to be reinstated. The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Connecticut on behalf of current and former students seeks no monetary damages. Rather, it demands changes to Yale's withdrawal policies, including the required forfeiture of health insurance and tuition payments, among other rules.

Target removes water beads toy after baby hospitalized for swallowing one
Target removes water beads toy after baby hospitalized for swallowing one

Target has removed a toy by Chuckle & Roar that includes water beads. The small expanding balls are often used in sensory kits, which are popular for children with autism.

US officials say 2 more places will test sewage for polio
US officials say 2 more places will test sewage for polio

Philadelphia and Oakland County, Michigan, are joining the small list of U.S. localities that are looking for signs of polio infections in sewage, U.S. health officials said Wednesday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the communities will test for polio in sewage for at least four months. Communities in New York state began testing earlier this year after a man was diagnosed with paralytic polio outside New York City.

When the Abortion Clinic Came to Town
When the Abortion Clinic Came to Town

There had never been an abortion clinic in the quiet college town of Carbondale, Illinois. So when its first clinic opened this fall, it revealed tensions between residents that had largely been hidden. Regine Garmon, a Carbondale resident who works at the clinic, was standing on the sidelines of her son's basketball game when she overheard a group of parents discussing the clinic's opening. One mother wondered aloud if the clinic's employees would encourage local teenagers to be sexually irresp

Corteva makes $1.2 billion bid for Stoller Group
Corteva makes $1.2 billion bid for Stoller Group

Biologicals related to the agriculture sector are a growing market and expected to represent about 25% of the overall crop protection market by 2035. Corteva has been working toward enhancing its portfolio of crop protection assets and bought Spain-based Symborg in September. The Stoller deal, which is expected to close in the first half of 2023, will be accretive to Corteva's core earnings in 2023, the companies said.

As overdoses soar in rural America, more clinicians are prescribing addiction medications
As overdoses soar in rural America, more clinicians are prescribing addiction medications

Opioid overdoses continue to rise in rural America, but more clinicians are prescribing buprenorphine, a medication used to help people recover from opioid addiction.

New York City will involuntarily hospitalize more mentally ill people under new plan
New York City will involuntarily hospitalize more mentally ill people under new plan

In a move he said is aimed at tackling the city's mental health "crisis," New York Mayor Eric Adams announced a directive Tuesday instructing police and first

New York City will
New York City will 'involuntarily' hospitalize homeless people with severe mental illness: What we know

Officials can hospitalize people "who pose a risk of harm to themselves even if they are not an imminent threat to the public," NYC Mayor Adams said.

Drug slows Alzheimer
Drug slows Alzheimer's but can it make a real difference?

Japanese drugmaker Eisai and its U.S. partner Biogen had announced earlier this fall that the drug lecanemab appeared to work, a badly needed bright spot after repeated disappointments in the quest for better Alzheimer's treatments. The data was presented at an Alzheimer's meeting in San Francisco and published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Twitter ends enforcement of COVID misinformation policy
Twitter ends enforcement of COVID misinformation policy

Twitter will no longer enforce its policy against COVID-19 misinformation, raising concerns among public health experts and social media researchers that the change could have serious consequences if it discourages vaccination and other efforts to combat the still-spreading virus. "This policy was used to silence people across the world who questioned the media narrative surrounding the virus and treatment options," tweeted Dr. Simone Gold, a physician and leading purveyor of COVID-19 misinformation. Twitter's decision to no longer remove false claims about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines disappointed public health officials, however, who said it could lead to more false claims about...

Half of Britain
Half of Britain's free-range Christmas turkeys lost to bird flu crisis

LONDON (Reuters) -Britons may struggle to get hold of a free-range turkey or goose for the Christmas table this year after an industry head said about half of them have either died or been culled due to the country's largest-ever outbreak of avian flu. Richard Griffiths, chief executive of the British Poultry Council, told lawmakers that British farmers usually produce 1.2 to 1.3 million free-range birds for the festive period. "We have seen around 600,000 of those free-range birds being directly affected," he said.

An internet hoax has dragged a popular China stationery company into the protests against the country
An internet hoax has dragged a popular China stationery company into the protests against the country's harsh COVID-19 restrictions

A fake document was shared online after demonstrators used blank sheets of paper to protest the Chinese government's restrictive 'zero-COVID' policy.

Young people accounted for greater proportion of COVID-19 deaths in 2021 than 2020: study
Young people accounted for greater proportion of COVID-19 deaths in 2021 than 2020: study

Story at a glance The median age of COVID-19 deaths fell from 78 years old in 2020 to 69 years old in 2021. To better understand this shift, researchers assessed years of life lost among those who died from COVID-19. More than 1 million Americans have died from the disease since March 2020. The proportion…

US stocks trade mixed while Chinese markets rebound on easing COVID-19 fears
US stocks trade mixed while Chinese markets rebound on easing COVID-19 fears

The Shanghai Composite Index climbed 2.3% and Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index jumped 5.2% after diving on Monday.

Here
Here's how China's COVID lockdown protests are sparking unrest across markets and rattling the global investing landscape.

Insider's Phil Rosen breaks down what's happening in China, and talks macro with portfolio manager Arthur Laffer Jr.

US futures rise and Hong Kong stocks jump 5% after China
US futures rise and Hong Kong stocks jump 5% after China's vaccination move boosts hopes for a zero-COVID pivot

After public unrest, China said Tuesday it would boost COVID vaccination rates of its elderly citizens, seen as a key step to reopening its economy.

Fauci called China
Fauci called China's 'zero-COVID' policy 'draconian' and says lockdowns 'should always be a temporary phenomenon'

Fauci said in an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper on Monday that lockdowns should have an "end game."

Flu continues to spread across the U.S., infecting millions, CDC reports
Flu continues to spread across the U.S., infecting millions, CDC reports

How active is the flu right now? Millions of cases of flu have been reported since the beginning of October, according to the latest data from the CDC.

Landmark trial over Arkansas youth gender care ban resumes
Landmark trial over Arkansas youth gender care ban resumes

A psychiatrist called to the stand by Arkansas as the state defends its ban on gender-affirming care for children said Monday he was concerned about the impact the law could have on some transgender youth who would see their treatments cut off. Dr. Stephen Levine, a psychiatrist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Ohio, testified as the nation's first trial over such a ban continued before a federal judge after a five-week break. Arkansas' law, which was temporarily blocked last year, would prohibit doctors from providing gender-affirming hormone treatment, puberty blockers or surgery to anyone under 18 years old.


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