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Climate change swells odds of record India, Pakistan heatwaves
Climate change swells odds of record India, Pakistan heatwaves

A UK study says record-breaking temperatures in NW India and Pakistan are now 100 times more likely.

InSight Mars lander nears the end of the road
InSight Mars lander nears the end of the road

NASA expects dwindling power to shut down the InSight Mars lander by the end of the year.

Tonga volcano eruption was powerful enough to reach space, new images from NASA show
Tonga volcano eruption was powerful enough to reach space, new images from NASA show

An underwater volcano erupted on January 15 near the Pacific island of Tonga. Scientists are beginning to understand just how big it was.

Mars dust is forcing NASA to say goodbye to its quake-hunting InSight lander early
Mars dust is forcing NASA to say goodbye to its quake-hunting InSight lander early

InSight detected more than 1,300 quakes on Mars, revealing the planet's inner layers for the first time. But NASA engineers couldn't clear the dust.

After Congress
After Congress' first hearing on UFOs in 50 years, some scientists want to be let in on the investigation

To better understand unidentified objects in the sky, we need to use satellites, fast-tracking cameras, and audio sensors, some scientists say.

Monkeypox cases in the UK are under
Monkeypox cases in the UK are under 'urgent investigation,' with 7 new infections

Monkeypox can cause puss-filled boils. It appears to be spreading through the community, which is "rare and unusual," a health official said.

NASA investigates another space helmet water leak
NASA investigates another space helmet water leak

While not as serious as a potentially life-threatening 2013 incident, NASA is taking no chances with the station's aging spacesuits.

Farm machinery exacting heavy toll on soil - study
Farm machinery exacting heavy toll on soil - study

Massive tractors and combine harvesters could be having a lasting impact on soil, a study suggests.

Perseverance: Nasa rover begins key drive to find life on Mars
Perseverance: Nasa rover begins key drive to find life on Mars

The Perseverance robot climbs a slope that could record evidence of ancient Martian biology.

See the photos of the "super flower blood moon"
See the photos of the "super flower blood moon"

Millions in the Americas, Europe and Africa were able to see the spectacular red glow of the total lunar eclipse.

'Blood moon' puts on lunar display across parts of Americas, Europe and Africa

A lunar eclipse early Monday produced a "blood moon," which occurs when the sun, Earth and moon align, and the moon passes through the darkest part of...

Tonga eruption was
Tonga eruption was 'record atmospheric explosion'

The January event was far bigger than any 20th Century volcanic event, or indeed any atom bomb test.

Full lunar eclipse to bring super blood Moon
Full lunar eclipse to bring super blood Moon

The Moon will slowly darken and turn red as it falls into Earth's shadow.

Researchers successfully grew plants in Apollo-era lunar soil. Their work could inform future space farmers.
Researchers successfully grew plants in Apollo-era lunar soil. Their work could inform future space farmers.

Plants grown in moon dirt showed signs of stress, were smaller, and grew more slowly than their counterparts grown in soil from Earth.

Birds are falling from the sky in India as a record heatwave dries up water sources
Birds are falling from the sky in India as a record heatwave dries up water sources

Vets in an animal hospital in Ahmedabad said they had treated thousands of dehydrated birds in recent weeks due to relentless "unsurvivable" heat.

Doctor planning womb transplant to allow a transgender woman to carry children
Doctor planning womb transplant to allow a transgender woman to carry children

A doctor in India is planning a womb transplant that might allow a transgender woman to carry children.

Latinos with chest pain wait in ER about half hour longer than others, study shows
Latinos with chest pain wait in ER about half hour longer than others, study shows

Latinos who reported chest pain in an emergency room waited half an hour longer than other races or ethnicities, a Morehouse School of Medicine study found.

Moon goes blood red this weekend:
Moon goes blood red this weekend: 'Eclipse for the Americas'

A total lunar eclipse will grace the night skies this weekend, providing longer than usual thrills for stargazers across North and South America. It will be...

Climate change doubled risk of deadly South Africa flood, scientists say
Climate change doubled risk of deadly South Africa flood, scientists say

Scientists warned that extreme events like this are likely to happen again "with even greater intensity."

Kraft Heinz is making a ketchup bottle made of wood pulp
Kraft Heinz is making a ketchup bottle made of wood pulp

Heinz announced it is working to develop a new recyclable condiment bottle "made from 100 percent sustainability sourced wood pulp."

Warship sonar could be causing mass dolphin deaths in the Black Sea
Warship sonar could be causing mass dolphin deaths in the Black Sea

ISTANBUL - Mass dolphin deaths have scientists worried that pollution from Russia's war in Ukraine could have lasting impacts on ecosystems in the region.

Moon soil used to grow plants for first time in breakthrough test
Moon soil used to grow plants for first time in breakthrough test

The research is an important step towards making long-terms stays on the moon possible.

Covid-19 narrows long-standing Latino mortality advantage, study finds
Covid-19 narrows long-standing Latino mortality advantage, study finds

Latinos have long experienced lower mortality rates compared to non-Hispanic whites, but the high rate of Hispanic Covid-19 deaths has narrowed the advantage...

Scientists grow plants in moon soil for the first time ever
Scientists grow plants in moon soil for the first time ever

NASA said​ the discovery paves the way for the possibility of harvesting plants in habitats on the moon in the future.

Private reproduction decisions like IVF and contraception could be at risk if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, experts say
Private reproduction decisions like IVF and contraception could be at risk if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, experts say

Insider spoke to lawyers and reproductive health doctors about the realities of private health decisions in a possible post-Roe world.

Black hole image supports Einstein
Black hole image supports Einstein's theory of gravity, disappointing scientists who are probing for cracks

Researchers captured the first image of our galaxy's supermassive black hole. It could help confirm Einstein's theory of general relativity.

Black hole: First picture of Milky Way monster
Black hole: First picture of Milky Way monster

Astronomers reveal the first ever image of the black hole at the core of our galaxy.

Supermassive black hole in Milky Way, at
Supermassive black hole in Milky Way, at 'heart of our galaxy,' revealed for first time

The first image of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy, named Sagittarius A*, has been captured by NASA's Event Horizon Telescope.

First image of black hole at the center of the Milky Way
First image of black hole at the center of the Milky Way

Three years after capturing the first image of a supermassive black hole​ in a galaxy 55 million light years away, astronomers have managed to "photograph...

Meet the black hole at the center of our galaxy: Scientists just took its picture for the first time
Meet the black hole at the center of our galaxy: Scientists just took its picture for the first time

Researchers unveiled the first image of the supermassive black hole lurking at the heart of our galaxy.

Audio captures sounds of black hole 240 million light-years away
Audio captures sounds of black hole 240 million light-years away

NASA said "this sonification is unlike any other done before."

Common Medications Can Prolong Back Pain When Overused, Study Says
Common Medications Can Prolong Back Pain When Overused, Study Says

The very treatments often used to soothe pain in the lower back, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says is the most common type of pain...

'Critical mass' of polluters setting carbon targets

The number of big firms setting climate targets reaches a 'critical mass' say UN-backed researchers.

Scientists might reveal the first photo of our galaxy
Scientists might reveal the first photo of our galaxy's central black hole on Thursday. Watch their announcement live.

Seven research institutions are holding simultaneous press conferences to announce what's being billed as a "groundbreaking Milky Way discovery."

Magnitude 4.2 earthquake strikes near Yellowstone
Magnitude 4.2 earthquake strikes near Yellowstone

There were no reports of damage or injuries.

Study finds cleaner air leads to more Atlantic hurricanes
Study finds cleaner air leads to more Atlantic hurricanes

Cleaner air in United States and Europe is brewing more Atlantic hurricanes, a new U.S. government study found. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

Great Barrier Reef survey reveals vast extent of coral bleaching
Great Barrier Reef survey reveals vast extent of coral bleaching

Researchers say climate change is "the greatest threat to the Reef."

UK confirms case of monkeypox, which causes boils and full-body rashes
UK confirms case of monkeypox, which causes boils and full-body rashes

The monkeypox patient, who is being treated at a specialist infectious disease facility, is thought to have caught the virus in Nigeria.

New study reveals environmental injustice in natural gas leaks
New study reveals environmental injustice in natural gas leaks

Researchers found that metro areas with predominantly people of color had a 37% high gas leak density than mostly white areas.

Most Great Barrier Reef coral studied this year was bleached
Most Great Barrier Reef coral studied this year was bleached

More than 90% of Great Barrier Reef coral surveyed this year was bleached in the fourth such mass event in seven years in the world's largest coral reef...

Wavering NASA lander detects biggest Mars quake yet, even as dust drains its energy
Wavering NASA lander detects biggest Mars quake yet, even as dust drains its energy

NASA's InSight lander is fighting a layer of Mars dust that's covering its solar panels and causing a power shortage. Still, it made a big discovery.

Global warming may exceed 1.5 degrees Celsius soon, report warns
Global warming may exceed 1.5 degrees Celsius soon, report warns

Scientists warn that the five-year forecast reveals a future where temperatures may exceed a dangerous threshold for longer time periods.

Scientists study secrets of starling murmurations
Scientists study secrets of starling murmurations

Theoretical physicists develop a mathematical model to explain how birds dip and dive in whirling flocks.

Humans are causing the ocean to lose its memory, study shows
Humans are causing the ocean to lose its memory, study shows

A new study found that global warming is making it more challenging to predict ocean conditions, manage ecosystems and prepare for marine hazards.

How to watch the "super flower blood moon" total lunar eclipse
How to watch the "super flower blood moon" total lunar eclipse

A spectacular full moon is fast-approaching. Here's everything you need to know to see it.

Supplies launched to China
Supplies launched to China's new space station for next crew

A Chinese cargo vessel docked with the country's under-construction space station Tuesday ahead of a new three-person crew expected to arrive next month...

Climate change: Airlines miss all but one target - report
Climate change: Airlines miss all but one target - report

Campaigners say the aviation industry cannot be relied on to tackle their role in climate change.

Climate change:
Climate change: 'Fifty-fifty chance' of breaching 1.5C warming limit

Scientists say there's now a strong chance that the world will warm by more than 1.5C by 2026.

Earth given 50-50 chance of hitting key warming mark by 2026
Earth given 50-50 chance of hitting key warming mark by 2026

With human-made climate change continuing, there's a 48% chance that the globe will reach a yearly average of 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit...

NASA reports "perfect" optical alignment for Webb telescope
NASA reports "perfect" optical alignment for Webb telescope

The first showcase images from the $10 billion telescope will be unveiled in mid July, after instrument checkout is complete.


Plan to feed phone data of NHS mental health patients to AI mothballed

An AI was designed to predict when people are at risk of having a mental health crisis, based on their health records, but plans to extend the project with mobile phone data seem to have been scrapped

Two newly described Amazon fish species are on the brink of extinction

New varieties of South American darter fish were documented in Brazil’s Apuí region. But deforestation in the area means they may soon be extinct

Pairs of giant planets may make their star systems ultra-habitable

Simulations of more than 140,000 possible planetary systems show that pairs of giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn may make their star systems more hospitable to habitable Earth-like worlds

Nearly a third of bites by malaria-carrying mosquitoes are in the day

Detailed analysis of mosquito bites in the Central African Republic found that, contrary to assumptions, many occur indoors during the daytime when people are not well protected by traditional anti-malaria defences

Emphysema missed among Black men in US due to race-adjusted lung tests

Poorly supported assumptions about typical levels of lung function among Black men in the US are leading medics to miss cases of emphysema

Which countries will do well at Eurovision 2022 – according to science

Neuroscientists measured 75 volunteers’ physiological responses while they watched eight countries’ performances to predict which songs will do well in the popular vote

Strange state of matter made into a pancake-shape for first time

A supersolid is an exotic state of matter that behaves like both a solid and a fluid. It was first predicted 60 years ago, but has only recently been created in the lab

Protein gel could help treat type 1 diabetes

The gel, which was implanted alongside a pancreatic cell transplant in monkeys with type 1 diabetes, releases a protein that kills overactive immune cells, preventing the pancreatic cells from being rejected

Genetically engineered bacteria have learned to play tic-tac-toe

E. coli bacteria modified to act like electronic components called memristors can be set up to act as a simple neural network and trained to play noughts and crosses

Launch of UK 'moonshot' ARIA research agency delayed until end of year

Neither ARIA's chief executive nor its chair have been appointed yet, though announcements are expected imminently

Covid-19 news: US records over 1 million coronavirus deaths

A regular round-up of the latest coronavirus news, plus insight, features and interviews from New Scientist about the covid-19 pandemic

Why some words become funnier when paired together

A study looking at more than 55,000 pairs of words has found why word pairings like "funk fungus" and "gnome bone" seem to be more amusing than their constituent parts

Sweater includes a wireless charger to keep your gadgets topped up

A sweater containing tubes filled with a liquid metal alloy can charge up wearable electronic devices

AI suggests how to make beer with whatever ingredients you have

Brewers could create new recipes that produce beers with desired properties using AI, and it will even work if you are missing some ingredients

A steroid might be why octopuses starve themselves after mating

After mating, female octopuses increase production of a steroid hormone, which may drive them to starve themselves while guarding their eggs

Coral reefs have conveyor belts of mucus running across their surface

Tiny cilia on coral reef polyps coordinate to generate currents that run across the reef surface, perhaps to carry food to all colony members

Growing plants in soil from the moon doesn't really work very well

Thale cress plants have been grown in regolith, the fine dust that covers the moon’s surface, using samples from Apollo missions – but they turn out small and stunted

How dragonflies use ultrafast wing movements to flip over in flight

When dropped upside down, dragonflies rapidly flip 180 degrees by changing the angle of their wings – but only if they can see their surroundings

What's next for Event Horizon Telescope after its black hole pictures?

Now that the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration has released its picture of the Milky Way's black hole, the team is focusing on making movies of the two photographed black holes and finding other distant black holes large enough to study

Computer powered by colony of blue-green algae has run for six months

Blue-green algae, a type of cyanobacteria, set in a container on a windowsill powered a computer continuously for six months using photosynthesis

UK environment watchdog rebukes government for slow action on nature

Cross-government support for the 25-year environment plan lacks the gravitas or urgency of the UK’s net zero goal, says the Office for Environmental Protection

'World-leading' research not confined to elite universities, says REF

The Research Excellence Framework, an assessment of UK universities' research output, has found that "world-leading" research is distributed across the country rather than concentrated in a few elite institutions

What is at risk if Roe v Wade is repealed in the US?

State laws could restrict abortion in large parts of the US, and other reproductive healthcare offerings may be at stake if Roe v Wade is overturned

Some medicines prescribed to treat back pain may prolong the problem

Two drugs called dexamethasone and diclofenac relieve pain in the short term but may block healing of the injury and so cause worse pain long term

Mars was wet more recently than we thought, according to Chinese rover

There may have been liquid water on Mars much more recently than we thought, according to an analysis of rocks by China’s Zhurong rover

Kenyan chameleons evolved brighter colours after moving to Hawaii

Chameleons introduced to Hawaii in 1972 have started flaunting brighter colours, probably because they have fewer predators to hide from

Invisible 3D printed tags turn simple objects into gaming controllers

Adding invisible tags to 3D printed objects could link the objects to information or turn them into controllers for gaming

Amazon deforestation in April was the worst in modern records

The area cleared in April almost doubled, from 579 square kilometres in April last year to 1012 square kilometres, despite a pledge to halt deforestation

Covid-19 news: Fourth vaccine may offer ‘substantial’ antibody boost

A regular round-up of the latest coronavirus news, plus insight, features and interviews from New Scientist about the covid-19 pandemic

Deadly 1918 flu pandemic may be source of modern milder seasonal virus

Viruses sequenced from century-old lung samples in German and Austrian museums have shed light on how flu can change over time

Maxwell's demon experiment could be made real without breaking physics

A thought experiment called Maxwell’s demon, long hypothesised to break the laws of physics, could be made using simple electronic devices at macroscopic scales – without upsetting the laws of thermodynamics

Rat testicle cells make sperm after being frozen for 23 years

Pre-pubescent children who become infertile because of cancer treatment may be able to make sperm after reimplanting frozen testicular tissue, if animal research translates to humans

A tiny graphene device could detect neutrinos from the big bang

Neutrinos from the early universe have never been detected directly but a device that uses the atom-thick material graphene might be able to change that

We have 48% chance of breaching 1.5°C target by 2026, says Met Office

Temporarily passing the threshold does not mean the world has missed the Paris Agreement’s goal, but it shows we are getting very close

Bats buzz like bees and hornets to scare off hungry owls

For the first time, researchers have recorded mammals mimicking the sounds of stinging insects as a survival mechanism: mouse-eared bats buzzing to keep barn and tawny owls at bay

Aliens could say hello by arranging planets in prime number pattern

A sufficiently advanced alien civilisation would be able to arrange the orbits of the planets in its star system in a pattern that could never form naturally, signaling its existence to others

Chemical computer can be programmed to solve hard problems

A chemical computer can now be programmed to solve concrete problems. The way it performs calculations is closer to a brain than a traditional computer so may help researchers to better understand how brains work

Roe v Wade: Are period-tracking apps still safe to use in the US?

Some period-tracking apps share data with third parties. With the potential rolling back of abortion protections in the US, people are reassessing if the data collected by these apps could be used as evidence against them

Inside big tech's $925 million plan to speed up carbon removal

Backed by Alphabet and Meta, Frontier is a $925 million approach borrowed from vaccine creation that hopes to boost embryonic companies taking carbon out of the atmosphere

Virtual ‘answering machine’ records the real world while you are in VR

People using virtual reality at work could use a new system to capture what happens around them and play back a 3D reconstruction later

Children's lack of time in nature is 'appalling', says Jane Goodall

The award-winning primatologist says the war in Ukriane is preoccupying her and she is losing sleep over the "horrific" conflict

Man who received pig heart transplant has died after pig virus found

Viral infection may explain why a pig's heart failed months after being transplanted in a ground-breaking surgery

Why is it hard to count the number of deaths caused by the pandemic?

A new estimate by the World Health Organization suggests that deaths from the pandemic are much higher than official figures – but that is because these figures are unreliable in many places

Privileged people misjudge effects of pro-equality policies on them

People from societally advantaged groups think equality-promoting policies will affect them negatively, even if they would actually benefit

Irritable bowel syndrome may be caused by overreacting gut cells

Epithelial cells in the gut continue to be active in mice even after an irritant or infection clears, which may be the source of chronic gut pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome

Anti-vaccine views may soften after people hear extreme implications

Taking anti-vaccine arguments to the extreme makes unvaccinated people in the US - but not the UK - more likely to say they will get covid-19 shots

Chinese rover finds lunar soil could make oxygen and fuel on the moon

Lunar soil collected by the Chang’e 5 rover has been analysed, revealing it could be used to help generate oxygen and fuel on the moon

Brain cells that are linked to Parkinson’s disease finally identified

High-tech genetic sequencing has found the brain cells connected to the movement disorder, which could lead to new treatments

Vast reservoir of water discovered under the ice in Antarctica

Ice streams in Antarctica carry ice from the continent’s centre to the ocean, and there appears to be a huge amount of water buried beneath one, which may affect its flow

Vaquitas could breed their way back from the brink of extinction

The 10 remaining vaquitas have enough genetic diversity to rebuild their species, but only if there is a dramatic reduction of illegal fishing operations in the Gulf of California

Top News: Science