Wisconsin's governor flip-flops on Tuesday primary, calls legislature into special session to cancel it




Wisconsin\
Wisconsin\'s governor flip-flops on Tuesday primary, calls legislature into special session to cancel it  

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers (D) has taken "last minute" to a whole new level.

Evers declared a mandatory shelter-in-place in his state on March 25 to reduce COVID-19 spread, taking the crisis seriously more than a week earlier than some states with larger populations. But he waited until Friday to take executive action to get the state's upcoming Democratic presidential primary canceled even though it's just four days away.

In a Friday video conference, Evers called a special session of the state's GOP-held legislature to compel it "to do its part - just as all of us are - to help keep our neighbors, our families, and our communities safe." He wants all in-person voting canceled so both voters and poll workers are not put at risk, and instead wants to extend the deadline for mail-in votes to the end of May.

The legislature has the power to push back the primary or change its format, but refused to do so when Evers asked it last week to send mail-in ballots to every voter in Wisconsin; Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos said the move would be "logistically impossible." Still, Democrats had blamed Evers for not doing more to push back the primary weeks ago. Even U.S. District Judge William M. Conley, who ultimately declined to push back the primary Thursday, had chided Evers and the legislature for putting the matter in his hands in the first place. Every other state with primaries in April has already pushed their date back.

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