Why resuming NBA play soon creates a logistical nightmare




 

Ever since Rudy Gobert tested positive for COVID-19, the NBA has not been the same.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver suspended the 2019-2020 season until further notice and has been seeking out any viable solution to get the NBA back on our television screens as soon as possible.

One leading idea being tossed around league circles is having the entirety of the NBA postseason be held in Vegas with no fans in attendance but make the games available to watch on national broadcasts. This route would necessitate all NBA players and staff to self-quarantine for two to three weeks before entering the Las Vegas bubble to create a safe zone from the pandemic.

On the latest Talkin' Blazers podcast, hosts Dan Sheldon and Channing Frye were joined by NBC Sports NBA Insider Tom Haberstroh to speculate on the logistical nightmare created by the need for players to self-quarantine.

Channing Frye shared his own take on the situation as a former NBA player himself.

The former NBA Champion then brought up how many people the elite players come into contact with that will also need to be quarantined.

Adam Silver has stated that a decision will not be made until May at the earliest, but the NBA and NBAPA are assessing multiple coronavirus testing options that may make playing again a reality.

You can listen to the full episode below.

Why resuming NBA play soon creates a logistical nightmare originally appeared on NBC Sports Northwest

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