Why is the president of the United States cyberbullying a 16-year-old girl?




Why is the president of the United States cyberbullying a 16-year-old girl?
Why is the president of the United States cyberbullying a 16-year-old girl?  

The morning after election day 2016, I got a call from a girls' school in New York where I was scheduled to speak. "We have to reschedule," said a representative from the school. "The girls are too upset."

Related: Trump appears to hit new Twitter record with impeachment tweets

Girls across the country were upset when Trump was elected, but not simply on partisan grounds. They were upset because Donald Trump was a bully, a cyberbully, and he bullied girls and young women like them - women like the former Miss Universe Alicia Machado, who revealed that, when she was 19, he called her "Miss Piggy," a dig at her weight.

In a New York Times poll in the run-up to the election, nearly half of girls aged 14 to 17 said that Trump's comments about women affected the way they think about their bodies. Only 15% of girls said they would vote for him if they could.

And now Trump has a new target for his bullying: Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old environmental activist. Thunberg seems to be really making Trump upset, without meaning to. She doesn't fit into any of his ideas of how girls are supposed to act. She isn't trying to be a contestant in one of his beauty pageants. She's too busy trying to get world leaders like him to do something about the climate crisis. She's too occupied by giving speeches at places like the UN - where Trump was laughed at, when he gave a speech in 2018, and Thunberg was met with respect, despite slamming the entire body for "misleading" the public with inadequate emission-reduction pledges.

In the last couple of weeks, while Trump was seemingly mocked by his peers at the Nato summit in London, and impeachment hearings against him began, Thunberg was named Time's person of the year, an honor Trump reportedly wanted. And so he did what he always seems to do, on Twitter, when he's upset: he lashed out by accusing the person upsetting him of the very things he's feeling, or is guilty of.

"Greta must work on her Anger Management problem, then go to a good old fashioned movie with a friend!" Trump tweeted on Thursday. "Chill Greta, Chill!"

Poor Trump. This tweet didn't sound very chill. And Thunberg knew it. Like the majority of girls growing up in the digital age, she has been cyberbullied before - by Trump himself, who, after her celebrated speech before the UN General Assembly, sarcastically tweeted, "She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!"

Both times Trump has tweeted about her, Thunberg's responses have been jocular, and sarcastic in kind. This week, she changed her Twitter bio to: "A teenager working on her anger management problem. Currently chilling and watching a good old fashioned movie with a friend."

In her handling of being cyberbullied by the president of the United States, at age 16, Thunberg has become an inspiration for girls two times over - first as a climate activist, then as a social media ninja.

But that doesn't mean that Trump's cyberbullying of Thunberg is any less despicable, or dangerous. What it says to girls all over the world is: no matter what you do, no matter how much you achieve, powerful men can and will try to cut you down.

This message is depressing, scary and not without potentially dire consequences. It's a message that has contributed to a precipitous rise in the suicide rate among girls. It's a message that has contributed to rising anxiety and depression among girls and young women. It's a message that Trump's wife, Melania, is supposed to be combatting, with her campaign against cyberbullying.

But girls don't need Melania Trump to be their role model in fighting against online harassment. They have each other, and they have Thunberg.

  • Nancy Jo Sales is a writer at Vanity Fair and the author of American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers

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