Warren, Sanders backers feud after 'Pocahontas' text message




Warren, Sanders backers feud after \
Warren, Sanders backers feud after \'Pocahontas\' text message  

A text message that referred to Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren as "Pocahontas" that was sent through rival Bernie Sanders' volunteer messaging system led to social media feuding and confusion among supporters of both candidates.

It turns out the text message came from a rogue Sanders campaign volunteer believed to be a supporter of President Donald Trump, the campaign told The Associated Press. The individual was removed from the system.

But the image of it, posted to Twitter on Monday by a pro-Warren fundraising group, led to misinformation and increased tension among Warren and Sanders supporters.

The campaign text message, addressed to a woman named Caitlin, asked: "Are you in for Bernie?"

The person responded by saying they weren't because they were a Warren campaign volunteer.

"Pocahontas, huh?" the text from the campaign replied - invoking the racial slur Trump regularly uses to mock Warren, who had previously claimed American Indian heritage.

Twitter users immediately questioned the veracity of the text message, with some claiming Warren's campaign staged the exchange and posted it online to undermine Sanders. Others insisted the image of the text exchange had been digitally manipulated.

In response, some pro-Sanders accounts tweeted out satirical images of offensive text messages from the Warren campaign that were shared online thousands of times.

The Twitter user who posted the image of the text message did not respond to the AP's request for comment.

The Warren campaign has no affiliation with the account that posted the text message campaign, a Warren spokesperson told the AP.

A Sanders campaign aide confirmed the text was sent from its system, which uses volunteers who can enroll online to send text messages to voters across the country.

The Sanders campaign told the AP that it believes a Trump supporter sent the text after joining the program. The campaign can view text messages sent by its volunteers, and it subsequently removed the individual from the program.

The Sanders campaign did not immediately respond to further questions about why they think the individual was a Trump supporter.

The cellphone number listed on the text message has also been disconnected.

___

Catch up on the 2020 election campaign with AP experts on our weekly politics podcast, "Ground Game."

COMMENTS

More Related News

'Will you shut up, man?': Testy exchanges on health care, Supreme Court among debate top moments

They bickered over their views on who should appoint the next Supreme Court justice, their stances on health care and even brought each other's families into the fray.

Key takeaways from the first presidential debate between Trump and Biden
Key takeaways from the first presidential debate between Trump and Biden

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden faced off in Cleveland in their first presidential debate.

Fast take: A rise in consumer confidence could boost vote for Trump
Fast take: A rise in consumer confidence could boost vote for Trump

U.S. consumer confidence rebounded more than expected in September, making its biggest monthly gain in 17 years, driven by perceived improvements in the job market, the Conference Board reported Tuesday.. The percentage of households saying jobs are "plentiful" increased to 22.9% from from 21.4%, the Conference Board said, compared with 20% who see jobs as hard to get. "It could be good news for Trump - the better people think about the economy, the more they vote for the incumbent," said Steven Blitz, Chief U.S. Economist at TS Lombard.

Biden says Trump needs to get
Biden says Trump needs to get 'a lot smarter' on COVID-19, Trump says 'there's nothing smart about you'

Half an hour into the first presidential debate, President Donald Trump took a jab at former Vice President Joe Biden's intelligence.

NY Times: Trump paid $750 in US income taxes in 2016, 2017
NY Times: Trump paid $750 in US income taxes in 2016, 2017

President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes the year he ran for president and in his first year in the White House, according to a report Sunday in The New York Times. Trump, who has fiercely guarded his tax filings and is the only president in modern times not to make them public, paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the past 15 years. The details of the tax filings complicate Trump's description of himself as a shrewd and patriotic businessman, revealing instead a series of financial losses and income from abroad that could come into conflict with his responsibilities as president.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Earnings