Virus forces French Open to September, juggling tennis year




  • In Sports/Tennis
  • 2020-03-17 17:28:15Z
  • By HOWARD FENDRICH (AP Tennis Writer)
Virus forces French Open to September, juggling tennis year
Virus forces French Open to September, juggling tennis year  

The French Open was postponed for about four months because of the coronavirus pandemic, juggling the tennis calendar by shifting from May to September.

The French tennis federation said Tuesday it will hold its 15-day clay-court event at Roland Garros in Paris from Sept. 20 to Oct. 4, instead of May 24 to June 7, ''to ensure the health and safety of everyone involved in organizing the tournament.''

Federation President Bernard Giudicelli described it as ''a difficult yet brave decision in this unprecedented situation.''

It's a similar move to what another major sports event, the Kentucky Derby, made in going from spring to fall.

This is the first instance of a Grand Slam tournament being affected by the virus that has spread around the world. The next major tennis championship on the calendar is Wimbledon, which is to start in late June in England.

The French Open's new dates place it right after the hard-court U.S. Open is currently scheduled to be held in New York, from Aug. 31 to Sept. 13. Having one week between two major championships, played on different surfaces, would be unusually short.

The new timeline for the French Open also conflicts with several WTA and ATP hard-court tournaments already slated for those two weeks, as well as the Laver Cup exhibition event in Boston.

''This is madness,'' tweeted Canadian pro Vasek Pospisil. ''Major announcement by Roland Garros changing the dates to one week after the US Open. No communication with the players or the ATP.. we have ZERO say in this sport. It's time. (hash)UniteThePlayers''

The BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California, a combined men's and women's event considered the sport's fifth major, was the first significant change to the tennis calendar when its postponement was announced March 8 because of COVID-19.

Last week, the men's and women's professional tennis tours began announcing cancellations of various tournaments in response to the viral outbreak.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia.

The vast majority of people recover. According to the World Health Organization, people with mild illness recover in about two weeks, while those with more severe illness may take three to six weeks to recover.

French President Emmanuel Macron announced Monday that for at least 15 days, people in that country would only be allowed to leave their homes for necessary activities such as shopping for food or going to work. He also banned gatherings of families and friends.

The French Open originally began in 1891 as the French Championships and has allowed foreign entrants since 1925. The only years in its history the tournament was not contested were from 1915-19 because of World War I and from 1940-45 because of World War II.

The end of this year's tournament was supposed to represent the cutoff for ATP and WTA ranking points that would help determine which players were eligible to compete in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics starting in late July.

The French federation said people who already purchased tickets for the French Open can either ask for refunds or exchanges.

Among the storylines anticipated for this edition of Roland Garros: Will Rafael Nadal be able to add a 13th title in Paris to his already record-setting collection there? Might Serena Williams make another run at winning a 24th Grand Slam trophy? And, now that the dates have changed, could Roger Federer end up participating? He was going to miss the tournament in May because he recently had knee surgery.

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AP Sports Writers Jerome Pugmire in Paris and Sam Petrequin in Brussels contributed to this report.

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More AP Tennis coverage: https://www.apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

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