Utah's Hatch to retire, opening door to possible Romney run




  • In Politics
  • 2018-01-02 21:36:10Z
  • By MATTHEW DALY and KEVIN FREKING
 

WASHINGTON (AP) - Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah said Tuesday he will not seek re-election after serving more than 40 years in the Senate, opening the door for former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney to run for his seat.

Hatch, 83, said he's always been a fighter, "but every good fighter knows when to hang up the gloves."

Hatch is the longest-serving Republican in the Senate. He chairs the powerful Senate Finance Committee and was a major force in getting a tax overhaul through Congress and signed into law in December.

He also played a key role in persuading President Donald Trump to sign proclamations scaling back two sprawling national monuments in Utah that Hatch and other conservatives considered examples of government overreach.

In a statement, Hatch said he decided to retire at the end of his seventh term after "much prayer and discussion with family and friends" over the holiday break.

"Only in a nation like ours could someone like me - the scrappy son of a simple carpenter - grow up to become a United States Senator," he added.

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor who now lives in Utah, has been eyeing a Senate run, but Trump had encouraged Hatch to seek re-election.

Romney thanked Hatch in a statement on Facebook and said Hatch "has represented the interests of Utah with distinction and honor."

Romney's statement did not mention his own plans.

Trump had been open in recent months about pressuring Hatch to stay in the Senate, particularly as Romney's ambition for the seat became apparent. Trump's private lobbying campaign was bolstered by a public love-fest, as Trump invited Hatch with him on Air Force One in December as he shrunk the boundaries of the two Utah monuments.

Trump called Hatch "a fighter" and "a special friend of mine," and thanked Hatch for his vocal support when "it wasn't exactly the easiest thing to do."

Romney has a far more tortured relationship with the president, having been a vocal critic of Trump's during the 2016 campaign, including delivering a broadside address in March 2016 condemning Trump. But after the election, Romney submitted himself as a candidate to be secretary of state in an excruciatingly public interview process.

Since Trump has moved into the White House, Romney has been a frequent detractor, particularly after Trump equivocated on condemning white supremacists in Charlottesville last summer.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Tuesday she had not discussed Romney's potential candidacy with Trump and could not say whether the president would support him.

Amid earlier speculation about Hatch's plans, the Utah senator stepped up to defend Romney, a fellow Mormon. Last month Hatch lashed out at former White House adviser Steve Bannon for his attack on Romney and the Mormon Church.

At a rally for Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, Bannon called Romney, the GOP's 2012 presidential nominee, a draft dodger who "hid behind" his religion. Romney received a draft deferment for missionary work in France during Vietnam.

Hatch called Bannon's attack "disappointing and unjustified" and said Romney "has sought every opportunity" to serve the country.

Hatch defended "the selfless service of missionary work" and said he'd be happy to explain his church to Bannon, adding, "I've got a copy of the Book of Mormon with his name on it."

Late last year, Hatch also found himself in a heated debate with Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio. The dispute occurred as Republicans pushed a near $1.5 trillion, 10-year tax cut for businesses and individuals through the Senate Finance Committee over Democrats' objections.

Brown, a liberal firebrand, said people know Republicans want to help the rich because it's "in their DNA."

Hatch told Brown he'd heard enough, adding that he's helped disadvantaged people "my whole stinking career." As the two senators talked over each other, Hatch said he was tired of Democrats' "bull crap."

In the statement announcing his decision to retire, Hatch cited work helping create the Americans with Disabilities Act, expanding children's health insurance and expanding use of generic drugs.

Hatch also served as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and was at the center of many of the biggest confirmation battles. During his time on the committee, the Senate has confirmed nearly 1,900 federal judges.

In 2000, Hatch sought the Republican nomination for president, saying he had more experience in Washington than his opponents and insisting he could work with Democrats. He withdrew from the race after only winning 1 percent of the vote in the Iowa caucuses and then endorsed George W. Bush.

Hatch frequently wrote religious songs and recorded music in his spare time as a way to relax from the stresses of life in Washington. One of his songs, "Unspoken," went platinum after appearing on "WOW Hits 2005," a compilation of Christian pop music.

While seeking re-election in 2012, Hatch pledged it would be his last term. He seemed to waver on that decision in recent months with Trump publicly calling on him to run again.

Romney would enter the Senate race as the heavy favorite, having carried Utah in 2012 by a margin of nearly 3 to 1 over Democrat Barack Obama. Romney, an unabashed Trump critic, would likely be among a small number of influential Republicans willing to take on Trump.

Derek Miller, a Utah businessman who had been considering a run for Hatch's seat, said Tuesday that Romney has popped up more frequently at policy gatherings, chamber of commerce meetings and social events in Utah.

"I go to events and I see Gov. Romney there, over the last couple months, when I never saw him at those events before," Miller said.

___

Associated Press writers Zeke Miller, Steve Peoples, Thomas Beaumont and Michelle Price contributed to this story.

COMMENTS

More Related News

North Korea says it has suspended nuclear, missile testing
North Korea says it has suspended nuclear, missile testing
  • World
  • 2018-04-20 23:45:51Z

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - North Korea said Saturday it has suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests and plans to close its nuclear test site.

Democratic Party sues Russia, Trump campaign for allegedly disrupting 2016 election
Democratic Party sues Russia, Trump campaign for allegedly disrupting 2016 election
  • US
  • 2018-04-20 18:01:08Z

The Democratic Party sued Russia, Republican President Donald Trump's campaign and WikiLeaks on Friday, charging that they conspired to disrupt the 2016 U.S. presidential election, a court filing showed. The party alleges in the federal lawsuit in Manhattan that top Trump campaign officials conspired with the Russian government and its military spy agency to hurt Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and tilt the election to Trump by hacking Democratic Party computers.

In Comey memos, Trump talks of jailed journalists,
In Comey memos, Trump talks of jailed journalists, 'hookers'

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a series of startlingly candid conversations, President Donald Trump told former FBI Director James Comey that he had serious concerns about the judgment of a top adviser, asked about the possibility of jailing journalists and described a boast from Vladimir Putin about Russian prostitutes

Comey memo: Trump complained about Flynn
Comey memo: Trump complained about Flynn's 'judgment issues'

President Donald Trump told former FBI Director James Comey that he had serious concerns about the judgment of his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, and Trump's chief of staff asked days later if Flynn's communications were being monitored under a secret surveillance warrant, according

Ex-Playboy Model Karen McDougal Free to Tell Her Trump Story After Settling Lawsuit With American Media
Ex-Playboy Model Karen McDougal Free to Tell Her Trump Story After Settling Lawsuit With American Media

Former Playboy model Karen McDougal has been freed up to tell her story about an alleged affair she had with Donald Trump, after settling a lawsuit with publisher American Media, McDougal said in a statement provided to TheWrap on Wednesday. "I am pleased to have reached a settlement with AMI on my own terms, which restores to me the rights to my life story and frees me from this contract that I was misled into signing nearly two years ago," McDougal said. McDougal's attorney, Peter Stris, said in his own statement, "We are glad that AMI has agreed to a settlement that restores Karen's life rights to her, and makes right the wrongs that had been perpetrated against her.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Politics

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.