US supreme court to hear oral arguments over Texas abortion law




  • In Politics
  • 2021-11-01 10:00:18Z
  • By The Guardian
 

The US supreme court is set to hear oral arguments over whether Texas can continue to allow private citizens to enforce a controversial six-week abortion ban on Monday.

Texas's ban has halted the vast majority of abortions in America's second largest state geographically, where more than 6 million women of child-bearing age live.

The focus of arguments is whether Texas can allow private citizens to enforce an abortion ban in direct contradiction to supreme court precedent in Roe v Wade, which provides a constitutional right to abortion to roughly 24 weeks, and whether the federal government then has standing to stop the law in court.

The nine-member bench will hear from three parties: attorneys for Texas, the Biden administration and abortion providers.

In briefs, Texas argued the supreme court should not review the case, and the state wrote the law specifically to frustrate opponents. SB8 deputizes private citizens to enforce its provisions in civil court, awarding plaintiffs $10,000 fees for any violation of its law, in an attempt to avoid federal court scrutiny.

However, Texas argued if the court did review its case, it should use the opportunity to overturn Roe v Wade. The landmark 1973 case allows abortion to the point a fetus can survive outside the womb. Texas's law bans abortion before most people know they are pregnant.

The court appears unlikely to overturn Roe v Wade in this case, and will probably focus instead on two other issues. First, is the private enforcement mechanism constitutional and, second, can the federal government sue to stop it?

Both the Biden administration and abortion providers have asked the court to block the law, claiming it is incompatible with Roe v Wade and causing immediate harm to people seeking abortions in Texas.

The hearing comes just one month before arguably the most important abortion rights case in five decades: Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization. In Dobbs, the court will consider whether Mississippi can ban nearly all abortion after 15 weeks gestation, roughly nine weeks earlier than supreme court precedent in Roe v Wade currently permits.

Both the court's decision not to block Texas's law and its acceptance of the Dobbs case are viewed as an ominous signs for the future of legal abortion in the US.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Family of Texas synagogue hostage-taker apologizes to victims
Family of Texas synagogue hostage-taker apologizes to victims
  • US
  • 2022-01-17 16:50:43Z

The family of Malik Faisal Akram, a British gunman who held four people hostage at a synagogue in Texas, has apologized for his actions.

Texas hostage crisis renews fears of increasing antisemitism in US
Texas hostage crisis renews fears of increasing antisemitism in US

According to Anti-Defamation League, there were over 2,100 acts of assault, vandalism and harassment last year A police vehicle sits near the Congregation...

WNBA players changed US politics in Georgia. NBA stars can do the same in Texas
WNBA players changed US politics in Georgia. NBA stars can do the same in Texas

As we mark MLK Day, there are plenty of signs the struggle for justice in the US is far from over. Athletes can make a real impact in changing the status quo...

Support flows to
Support flows to 'changed' Texas synagogue after standoff
  • US
  • 2022-01-17 06:02:38Z

The tight-knit congregation at a Texas synagogue where four people were held hostage by an armed captor during a 10-hour standoff over the weekend traces its...

Texas synagogue hostage crisis is a terrorism-related matter,
Texas synagogue hostage crisis is a terrorism-related matter,' FBI says
  • US
  • 2022-01-17 05:55:53Z

Malik Faisal Akram, the British national who was killed Saturday night after allegedly taking four people hostage inside a Texas synagogue, spoke "repeatedly...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Politics