US angers China after sailing two warships close to disputed South China Sea islands




 

China's foreign ministry expressed anger on Monday after two US warships sailed near islands claimed by China in the disputed South China Sea.

The ships entered the waters without China's permission, ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a daily news briefing.

Beijing and Washington are locked in a trade war and the two sides are trying to hammer out a deal ahead of a March 1 deadline when US tariffs on $200 billion (£155 billion) worth of Chinese imports are scheduled to increase to 25 per cent from 10 per cent.

Escalating tensions between the US and China have cost both countries billions of dollars and roiled global financial markets.

A US official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the two guided-missile destroyers traveled within 12 nautical miles of Mischief Reef in the disputed Spratly Islands.

The operation was the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing's efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese and some Southeast Asian navies operate.

China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lambasts the US and its allies over naval operations near Chinese-occupied islands.

China and the US have repeatedly traded barbs in the past over what Washington says is Beijing's militarization of the South China Sea by building military installations on artificial islands and reefs.

China defends its construction as necessary for self-defense and says it is the United States that is responsible for ratcheting up tensions in the region by sending warships and military planes close to islands Beijing claims.

Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia and Taiwan have competing claims in the region.

Fears have grown in recent months that the US-China trade dispute is just one element in a bilateral relationship that is fast cooling across the board, with top US administration officials sharply criticizing Beijing for everything from human rights abuses to cyber espionage in the US.

The two countries are also at odds over regional security, including Washington's overtures to the self-ruled island of Taiwan, which China claims as its own.

Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.

COMMENTS

More Related News

How Does the Geely Geometry A Measure Up to the Tesla Model 3?
How Does the Geely Geometry A Measure Up to the Tesla Model 3?

Is the Chinese automaker capable of making a Tesla Model 3 fighter? We do the math.

China complains to U.S. over end to Iran oil sanction waivers
China complains to U.S. over end to Iran oil sanction waivers

China's Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday it has formally complained to the United States over its decision to end waivers on sanctions on Iranian oil imports, adding another fault line to already complicated Beijing-Washington ties. China is Iran's largest crude oil customer, with total imports last year of 29.27 million tonnes, or about 585,400 barrels a day, roughly 6 percent of China's total oil imports, according to customs data. Washington has announced that all Iran sanction waivers will end by May, causing crude oil prices to rise and pressuring importers to cut their Iranian imports to zero.

China shows off new destroyer as Xi views naval parade
China shows off new destroyer as Xi views naval parade
  • World
  • 2019-04-23 08:55:36Z

Xi is overseeing a sweeping plan to refurbish the People's Liberation Army (PLA) by developing everything from stealth jets to aircraft carriers as China ramps up its presence in the disputed South China Sea and around self-ruled Taiwan, which have rattled nerves around the region and in Washington. The navy has been a major beneficiary of the modernization, with China looking to project power far from its shores and protect its trading routes and citizens overseas. After boarding the destroyer the Xining, which was only commissioned two years ago, Xi watched as a flotilla of Chinese and foreign ships sailed past, in waters off the eastern port city of Qingdao.

On South America
On South America's largest solar farm, Chinese power radiates
  • World
  • 2019-04-23 05:55:00Z

Local officials said they had sought help at home, the United States and Europe without success. Potential lenders and partners, they said, were spooked by the project's size and the fiscal woes of Jujuy province, one of the poorest in the country. The Import-Export Bank of China saw it differently.

China plastic waste ban throws global recycling into chaos
China plastic waste ban throws global recycling into chaos

From grubby packaging engulfing small Southeast Asian communities to waste piling up in plants from the US to Australia, China's ban on accepting the world's used plastic has plunged global recycling into turmoil. For many years, China received the bulk of scrap plastic from around the world, processing much of it into a higher quality material that could be used by manufacturers.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.