U.S. looks to test ground-launched cruise missile in August




  • In US
  • 2019-03-13 21:45:31Z
  • By By Idrees Ali
The Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) element of the U.
The Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) element of the U.  

By Idrees Ali

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States is aiming to test a ground-launched cruise missile with a range of about 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) in August, a Pentagon official said on Wednesday, after Washington announced that it plans to withdraw from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty.

Last month, the United States announced it would withdraw from the INF Treaty in six months unless Moscow ends what Washington says are violations of the 1987 pact.

Russia announced it was suspending the treaty. Moscow denies flouting the accord and has accused Washington of breaking the accord itself, allegations rejected by the United States.

"We're going to test a ground launched cruise missile in August," a senior defense official, who declined to be named, said.

If the testing is successful, the missile could be deployed in about 18 months and would have a range of about 1,000 kilometers (621 miles).

The official said the United States was also looking to test an intermediate-range ballistic missile in November, adding that both would be conventional and not nuclear.

The INF treaty, negotiated by then-President Ronald Reagan and former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and ratified by the U.S. Senate, eliminated the medium-range missile arsenals of the world's two biggest nuclear powers and reduced their ability to launch a nuclear strike at short notice.

The INF treaty required the parties to destroy ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges of between 500 and 5,500 km (310 to 3,420 miles).

The United Nations has urged the United States and Russia to preserve the treaty, saying its loss would make the world more insecure and unstable.

Last month Russian President Vladimir Putin said Russia is militarily ready for a Cuban Missile-style crisis if the United States wanted one and threatened to place hypersonic nuclear missiles on ships or submarines near U.S. territorial waters.

The Cuban Missile Crisis erupted in 1962 when Moscow responded to a U.S. missile deployment in Turkey by sending ballistic missiles to Cuba, sparking a standoff that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war.

More than five decades on, tensions are rising again over Russian fears that the United States might deploy intermediate-range nuclear missiles in Europe, as a landmark Cold War-era arms-control treaty unravels.

"We haven't engaged any of our allies about forward deployment," the U.S. defense official said. "Honestly, we haven't been thinking about this because we have been scrupulously abiding by the treaty."


(Reporting by Idrees Ali)

COMMENTS

More Related News

Exclusive: Iran
Exclusive: Iran's Zarif believes Trump does not want war, but could be lured into conflict

"I don't think he wants war," Zarif said in an interview at the Iranian mission to the United Nations in New York. "But that doesn't exclude him being basically lured into one." The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Zarif's remarks. Zarif said a so-called "B-team," including Trump's national security adviser John Bolton, an ardent Iran hawk, and conservative Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu could goad Trump into a conflict with Tehran.

Iran
Iran's Zarif warns U.S. of 'consequences' over oil sanctions, offer prisoner swap

The United States must be prepared for consequences if it tries to stop Iran from selling oil and using the Strait of Hormuz, Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned on Wednesday, while also offering to negotiate prisoner swaps with Washington. The United States on Monday demanded buyers

Iran
Iran's Zarif warns U.S. of 'consequences' over oil sanctions, Strait of Hormuz

The United States on Monday demanded buyers of Iranian oil stop purchases by May or face sanctions, ending six months of waivers which allowed Iran's eight biggest buyers, most of them in Asia, to continue importing limited volumes. "We believe that Iran will continue to sell its oil. Reinforcing Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's stance, Zarif warned: "If the United States takes the crazy measure of trying to prevent us from doing that, then it should be prepared for the consequences." He did not give specifics.

Iran can export as much oil as it needs - supreme leader
Iran can export as much oil as it needs - supreme leader

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Wednesday that the country can export as much oil as it needs, his official website reported, as the United States prepares to end sanctions waivers it granted to some importers of Iranian crude. "America's efforts in sanctioning the

Mexico tells US to invest in Central America to stem migration
Mexico tells US to invest in Central America to stem migration

Mexico President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador told the United States on Tuesday that if it wants to stem the flow of Central American migrants to its southern border, it needs to invest in the region. Slowing entries from Mexico has been a major focus of President Donald Trump's administration amid numerous reports of migrant caravans heading up from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras in the hope of a better life. The migrants say they are fleeing poverty and gang violence, but Trump has characterized many as criminals and has ramped up pressure on Mexico to help ease the strain on US immigration authorities.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.