U.S. appeals court orders EPA to ban pesticide said to harm children




  • In US
  • 2018-08-09 17:44:56Z
  • By By Jonathan Stempel
FILE PHOTO:    EPA Administrator Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations  Subcommittee hearing on the proposed budget for the Environmental Protection Agency on Capitol Hill in Washington
FILE PHOTO: EPA Administrator Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee hearing on the proposed budget for the Environmental Protection Agency on Capitol Hill in Washington  

By Jonathan Stempel

(Reuters) - A divided federal appeals court on Thursday ordered the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to ban a widely-used pesticide that critics say can harm children and farmers.

The 2-1 decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Seattle overturned former EPA commissioner Scott Pruitt's March 2017 denial of a petition by environmental groups to ban the use of chlorpyrifos on food crops such as fruits, vegetables and nuts.

"This shows that the EPA can't just ignore the science that this pesticide damages children's brains," Marisa Ordonia, a lawyer for Earthjustice, which represented the petitioners, said in an interview. "The Trump administration has to follow the law, as does everyone else."

Pruitt's ruling, one of many by the administration to reduce federal regulatory oversight, had reversed a 2015 Obama administration recommendation to extend to food a 2000 ban on chlorpyrifos that covered most household settings.

Writing for the Seattle-based appeals court, Judge Jed Rakoff directed the EPA to ban chlorpyrifos within 60 days, saying the agency failed to counteract "scientific evidence that its residue on food causes neurodevelopmental damage to children."

Rakoff also faulted the EPA for going against its own 2016 risk assessment for the pesticide, "largely ignoring" and then "temporizing" in its response to the petition, and wrongly declaring that the court had no business deciding the matter.

"If Congress's statutory mandates are to mean anything, the time has come to put a stop to this patent evasion," wrote Rakoff, who normally sits on the federal district court in Manhattan.

Wyn Hornbuckle, a U.S. Department of Justice spokesman, said that office is reviewing the decision.

Groups that challenged Pruitt's order included the Natural Resources Defense Council, the United Farm Workers, and others.

The attorneys general of New York, California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Vermont, Washington state and Washington, D.C. also challenged Pruitt's order.

"Today's decision is a huge win for our children's health," New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood said in a statement.

Circuit Judge Ferdinand Fernandez dissented from Thursday's decision, saying the court lacked jurisdiction, though its discussion of the petition's merits had "some persuasive value."

In issuing his order, Pruitt had said the EPA needed to provide "regulatory certainty" to the thousands of American farms that use chlorpyrifos, while protecting people's health and the environment.

"By reversing the previous administration's steps to ban one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, we are returning to using sound science in decision making - rather than predetermined results," Pruitt had said.

The case is League of United Latin American Citizens et al v New York et al, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, No. 17-71636.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; editing by Bill Berkrot)

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