Turkey spars with EU over fresh drilling off Cyprus




Turkey spars with EU over fresh drilling off Cyprus
Turkey spars with EU over fresh drilling off Cyprus  

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkey called on Sunday for the European Union to end what it said was the bloc's prejudice against Turkish Cypriots, defending its launch of a fresh round of hydrocarbons drilling off the Mediterranean island.

Turkey began drilling for oil and gas near Cyprus last year despite warnings from the EU, stoking tensions with neighboring members Greece and Cyprus.

In the latest move, Energy Minister Fatih Donmez on Friday told the state-owned Anadolu news agency that Turkey's Yavuz drilling ship was setting off for Cyprus, prompting cautionary EU comments.

"The EU has remained silent since 2003 to the usurping of our country's and the Turkish Cypriots' rights in the eastern Mediterranean," Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Hami Aksoy said in a written statement.

"The European Union must firstly end these policies under the guise of union solidarity, which are far from reality, prejudiced and show double standards."

Cyprus was divided in a Turkish invasion in 1974 after a brief Greek-inspired coup. Turkey supports a breakaway Turkish Cypriot state in the north of the island.

Responding to the announcement of fresh drilling, EU foreign affairs spokesman Peter Stano said on Saturday that concrete steps were needed to create an environment conducive to dialogue.

"The intention by Turkey to launch further exploration and drilling activities in the wider region goes, regrettably, in the opposite direction," Stano said in a statement.

Aksoy said the ship Yavuz was heading for the south of Cyprus to an area for which Turkish Cypriot authorities awarded an exploration license to a Turkish company in 2011.

Cyprus's internationally recognized government discovered offshore gas in 2011 but has been at loggerheads with Turkey over maritime zones around the island, where it has granted licenses to multinational companies for oil and gas research.

Turkey, which does not have diplomatic relations with Cyprus's government, says that some areas in which Nicosia has operations are either on the Turkish continental shelf or in areas where the breakaway Turkish Cypriot state has rights over any finds.


(Reporting by Daren Butler; Editing by David Goodman)

COMMENTS

More Related News

Exclusive: EU in early talks with Italy
Exclusive: EU in early talks with Italy's ReiThera over potential vaccine supply deal - source

Italian biotech ReiThera is in early talks with the European Union about supplying the bloc with its potential COVID-19 vaccine, a source close to the company said, the latest attempt by Brussels to secure shots as the fight against the pandemic intensifies. The discussions come as Brussels seeks to raise more money to shore up supplies of potential inoculations amid concerns demand next year might exceed supply. The talks with ReiThera, which is developing a vaccine together with Germany's Leukocare and Belgium's Univercells, means the European Commission is now speaking with seven vaccine makers including Johnson & Johnson, Moderna, Pfizer and CureVac about possible supply deals.

Spain faces unusual problem: how to spend billions in crisis funds
Spain faces unusual problem: how to spend billions in crisis funds

After securing a generous portion of European Union recovery funds for the coronavirus crisis, Spain faces an unlikely problem -- how to make use of all the money, government sources told Reuters. "This is not a crisis of dough (money), it is a crisis of ideas," one of the sources said, referring to concrete investment projects to help the economy out of a record recession. Spain has been hit particularly badly by the pandemic.

EU research unit: a regulated crypto-asset sector could improve the bloc
EU research unit: a regulated crypto-asset sector could improve the bloc's economic outlook

A study by the European Parliamentary Research Service claims that the digitalization of assets could benefit the European Union's overall economy. The post EU research unit: a regulated crypto-asset sector could improve the bloc's economic outlook appeared first on The Block.

Facebook tells Irish court that probe threatens its EU operations - newspaper
Facebook tells Irish court that probe threatens its EU operations - newspaper

Facebook has told Ireland's High Court it cannot see how its services could operate in the European Union if regulators freeze its data transfer mechanism, the Sunday Business Post reported, citing court documents seen by the paper. The U.S. social media giant last week said that the Irish Data Protection Commission, its lead EU regulator, had made a preliminary decision that the mechanism it uses to transfer data from the EU to the United States "cannot in practice be used". Facebook requested and secured a temporary freeze on the order and a court review in the Irish High Court, which is due to consider the issue in November.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America