Trump to pursue higher sales age for e-cigarettes




  • In Business
  • 2019-11-08 18:26:54Z
  • By Associated Press
Trump to pursue higher sales age for e-cigarettes
Trump to pursue higher sales age for e-cigarettes  

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump said Friday his administration will pursue raising the age to purchase electronic cigarettes from 18 to 21 in its upcoming plans to combat youth vaping.

Trump told reporters his administration will release its final plans for restricting e-cigarettes next week but provided few other details.

"We have to take care of our kids, most importantly, so we're going to have an age limit of 21 or so," said Trump, speaking outside the White House.

Currently the minimum age to purchase any tobacco or vaping product is 18, under federal law. But more than one third of U.S. states have already raised their sales age to 21.

A federal law raising the purchase age would require congressional action.

Administration officials were widely expected to release plans this week for removing virtually all flavored e-cigarettes from the market. Those products are blamed for soaring rates of underage use by U.S. teenagers.

However, no details have yet appeared, leading vaping critics to worry that the administration is backing away from its original plan.

Trump resisted any specifics on the scope of the restrictions.

"We're talking about the age, we're talking about flavors, we're also talking about keeping people working - there are some pretty good aspects," Trump said.

E-cigarettes have been sold in the U.S. for more than a decade and are often pitched as a lower-risk option for smokers. But there is little research on their long-term health effects.

In a separate event Friday, Joe Grogan, a top policy adviser to Trump, said the White House believes e-cigarettes are "a viable alternative to combustible cigarettes." He suggested the administration's decision on vaping would reflect that potential benefit.

"We really want to make sure we're data driven on this and striking the right balance between adult choice and protecting kids," Grogan told reporters.

Underage vaping has reached what health officials call epidemic levels. In the latest government survey, 1 in 4 high school students reported using e-cigarettes in the previous month.

Fruit, candy, dessert and other sweet vaping flavors have been targeted because of their appeal to underage users.

On Thursday, Juul Labs, the nation's largest e-cigarette maker, announced it would voluntarily pull its mint-flavored e-cigarettes from the market. That decision followed new research that Juul's mint is the top choice for many high school students who vape.

With the removal of mint, Juul only sells two flavors: tobacco and menthol.

Vaping critics say menthol must be a part of the flavor ban to prevent teens who currently use mint from switching over.

Juul and other tobacco companies have lobbied in support a federal "Tobacco 21" law to reverse teen use of both e-cigarettes and traditional tobacco products. The effort also has broad bipartisan support in Congress, including a bill introduced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The logic for hiking the purchase age for cigarettes and other products is clear: most underage teens who use e-cigarettes or tobacco get it from older friends. Raising the minimum age to 21 is expected to limit the supply of those products in U.S. schools.

Delaying access to cigarettes is also expected to produce major downstream health benefits, with one government-funded report estimating nearly 250,000 fewer deaths due to tobacco over several decades.

Still, anti-tobacco groups have insisted that any "Tobacco 21" law must be accompanied by a ban on flavors, which they say are the primary reason that young people use e-cigarettes.

___

Follow Matthew Perrone on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AP_FDAwriter

COMMENTS

More Related News

Judge dismisses Trump lawsuit against NY officials, House committee over taxes
Judge dismisses Trump lawsuit against NY officials, House committee over taxes

A federal judge on Monday issued another blow to President Donald Trump and his ongoing effort to avoid having his tax records turned over to Congress. U.S. Judge Carl Nichols granted a motion to dismiss a lawsuit that Trump filed in July over the TRUST Act in New York, which gave Congress the authority to retrieve tax information from New York residents.

Fox News Contributor Causes Scene When She Names Alleged Whistleblower on Air
Fox News Contributor Causes Scene When She Names Alleged Whistleblower on Air

Fox News contributor Mollie Hemingway caused a scene on Sunday morning when she purposely named the alleged whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry against President Trump, seemingly breaking the network's policy of identifying the person.Amid a concerted effort by Trump's allies to publicly out the whistleblower who filed the complaint about Trump's infamous July 25 call with the Ukrainian president, right-wing media outlets have touted an online report purportedly sharing the identity of the person. Mainstream media outlets and social media platforms, meanwhile, have refrained from spreading the person's name.Fox News had reportedly also instructed its employees to not...

In Seeking to Join Suit Over Subpoena Power, Mulvaney Goes Up Against the President
In Seeking to Join Suit Over Subpoena Power, Mulvaney Goes Up Against the President

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- Even in a White House of never-befores, this may be one of the more head-spinning: The president's chief of staff is trying to join a lawsuit against the president.Mick Mulvaney works only about 50 steps from the Oval Office as he runs the White House staff, but rather than simply obey President Donald Trump's order to not cooperate with House impeachment investigators, he sent his lawyers to court late Friday night asking a judge whether he should or not.To obtain such a ruling, the lawyers asked to join a lawsuit already filed by a former White House official -- a lawsuit that names "the Honorable Donald J. Trump" as a defendant along with congressional...

'Baby Trump' balloon slashed at Alabama appearance

A towering "Baby Trump" protest balloon was knifed and deflated by someone unhappy with its appearance during President Donald Trump's Saturday trip to Alabama, organizers said. The incident occurred during Trump's visit to watch the University of Alabama football game. Jim Girvan, the organizer of a group that "adopts" out the Trump balloons for protests, said a man charged the balloon with a knife and cut an 8-foot-long (2.4-meter-long) gash in the back.

GOP wants Hunter Biden, whistleblower to testify in Trump impeachment inquiry
GOP wants Hunter Biden, whistleblower to testify in Trump impeachment inquiry

The witness list includes Hunter Biden and the whistleblower along with six other people Republicans want to publicly testify.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Business