Trump threatens to withhold funds from Michigan, Nevada over mail-in voting




  • In US
  • 2020-05-20 11:59:21Z
  • By Reuters
Trump threatens to withhold funds from Michigan, Nevada over mail-in voting
Trump threatens to withhold funds from Michigan, Nevada over mail-in voting  

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Wednesday called plans for expanded mail-in voting in Michigan and Nevada illegal, without citing a specific law, and threatened to withhold funding to the states - the latest Republican move to try to undo steps aimed at making it easier and safer to vote during the coronavirus pandemic.

States have broad powers on setting rules for voting. Trump, who has expressed his opposition to mail-in voting, said without evidence that the efforts in Michigan and Nevada - states that could be pivotal in his Nov. 3 re-election bid - could lead to voter fraud.

"This was done illegally and without authorization by a rogue Secretary of State. I will ask to hold up funding to Michigan if they want to go down this Voter Fraud path!" Trump wrote on Twitter.

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson on Tuesday said all 7.7 million Michigan voters would receive absentee ballot applications before the Aug. 4 state primaries and the November general election so no one "has to choose between their health and their right to vote."

Nevada has made its June 9 state primaries an all-mail election, sending absentee ballots to registered voters. The state official responsible for elections is a Republican.

"State of Nevada 'thinks' that they can send out illegal vote by mail ballots, creating a great Voter Fraud scenario for the State and the U.S. They can't! If they do, 'I think' I can hold up funds to the State," Trump tweeted.

Democrats have accused Republicans of voter suppression efforts intended to reduce participation by voters who tend to back Democrats. Republicans blocked a move by Wisconsin's Democratic governor to make last month's primary an all-mail election amid the pandemic.

Trump has said mail-in voting leads to fraud. Numerous studies have found little evidence of that. Democrats have said mail-in voting is a safer alternative to in-person balloting during the pandemic, helping to prevent crowds at polling places.


(Reporting by Lisa Lambert and John Whitesides; Editing by Will Dunham, Andrew Heavens and Chizu Nomiyama)

COMMENTS

More Related News

Win the vote but still lose? Behold the US Electoral College
Win the vote but still lose? Behold the US Electoral College

"Beautiful" is how US political outsider Donald Trump described his shock presidential win against rival Hillary Clinton on the night of November 8, 2016.

Trump
Trump's tax revelations spark outrage among some, but supporters defend president

A report that Donald Trump paid little or no federal income tax in recent years sparked broad outrage on Monday, from rich Democrats to teachers and coffee shop workers taking to social media to claim they had paid more taxes than the U.S. president. The #IPaidMoreTaxesThanDonaldTrump hashtag began trending on Monday, while Democratic rival Joe Biden's election campaign, seizing on the backlash, launched a pin with the words: 'I Paid More In Taxes Than Donald Trump.' "In 2017, I paid $32 million more in federal taxes than Donald Trump," Tom Steyer, a billionaire environmentalist and a fierce critic of the president, wrote on Twitter.

US 2020 election: Social media
US 2020 election: Social media's nightmare scenario

Potential election chaos will play out on social media, and Big Tech is worried.

Ethics experts see national security concern in Trump
Ethics experts see national security concern in Trump's debt

Revelations that President Donald Trump is personally liable for more than $400 million in debt are casting a shadow that ethics experts say raises national security concerns he could be manipulated to sway U.S. policy by organizations or individuals he's indebted to. New scrutiny of Trump, who claims great success as a private businessman, comes after The New York Times reported that tax records show he is personally carrying a staggering amount of debt - including more than $300 million in loans that will come due in the next four years. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., was blunt about the potential implications.

NY Times: Trump paid $750 in US income taxes in 2016, 2017
NY Times: Trump paid $750 in US income taxes in 2016, 2017

President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes the year he ran for president and in his first year in the White House, according to a report Sunday in The New York Times. Trump, who has fiercely guarded his tax filings and is the only president in modern times not to make them public, paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the past 15 years. The details of the tax filings complicate Trump's description of himself as a shrewd and patriotic businessman, revealing instead a series of financial losses and income from abroad that could come into conflict with his responsibilities as president.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

  • Take My Class
    (2020-05-20 20:42:22Z)

    I would figure that each case would have its comparable conversation dependent on the lawful system for the case. I'm expecting that achievement or disappointment in one zone would not suggest disappointment or accomplishment in another.

    REPLY
  • Online Course Help
    (2020-09-16 08:50:14Z)

    Don’t waste time and get your order placed with us today. Our order process is simple, don’t fret just leave us a message.

    REPLY

Top News: US