Trump Lawyers Want A Second Special Counsel




Trump Lawyers Want A Second Special Counsel
Trump Lawyers Want A Second Special Counsel  

President Donald Trump's legal team says it's fed up with the Justice Department and FBI "witch hunt" into whether his campaign colluded with the Russian government.

One of Trump's lawyers said the president's legal team wants a second special counsel ― one to investigate the investigators ― after a Fox News report unearthed what the lawyer called a conflict of interest in the Department of Justice.

Fox News reported late Monday that Nellie H. Ohr, the wife of a senior Justice Department official who was demoted last week for not being forthcoming about meetings with Fusion GPS, the firm behind the anti-Trump dossier, worked for Fusion for a part of last year. The dossier reportedly contains salacious but unverified allegations against Trump. It's unclear whether Ohr is implicated in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

″The Department of Justice and FBI cannot ignore the multiple problems that have been created by these obvious conflicts of interests," Jay Sekulow, one of Trump's lawyers, told Axios on Monday night after the Fox report. "These new revelations require the appointment of a special counsel to investigate."

Trump has repeatedly complained Mueller's probe into Russia and Trump's campaign is a "witch hunt" and reportedly has considered firing the special counsel.

Nevertheless, the president's legal team said they trust Mueller and want to "get to the finish line" with him. They said they plan to fully cooperate with Mueller's investigation, confident that Trump will be cleared of wrongdoing.

The New York Times reported on another potential conflict of interest earlier this month. Mueller reassigned a top FBI agent, Peter Strzok, over the summer after it was discovered that Strzok had sent anti-Trump text messages to FBI lawyer Lisa Page, who worked for Mueller's team.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions apparently contemplated the idea of appointing a second special counsel in November, according to The Washington Post.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Democrats, GOP hold out hope for ending government shutdown
Democrats, GOP hold out hope for ending government shutdown

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's budget director is holding out hope that feuding Democrats and Republicans in Congress can reach a short-term spending agreement before the start of the workweek Monday, but he worries that the government shutdown could last for several more days if progress

Trump: Senate should change rules if shutdown stalemate continues
Trump: Senate should change rules if shutdown stalemate continues
  • US
  • 2018-01-21 15:01:08Z

By Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Sunday that if the government shutdown stalemate continued, Republicans should fund the government by changing Senate rules, which currently require a super-majority for appropriations bills to pass. "The Dems (Democrats) just want illegal immigrants to pour into our nation unchecked.

Trump Tweeted Support For The Women's Marches. It Backfired.
Trump Tweeted Support For The Women's Marches. It Backfired.

President Donald Trump addressed the Women's Marches last year by suggesting that the hundreds of thousands of people who turned out should have expressed their feelings toward him at the ballot box.

Make No Mistake, Trump's Government Shutdown Is About Racism
Make No Mistake, Trump's Government Shutdown Is About Racism

Lost in the shitstorm over "shithole" was another equally damning example of President Donald Trump's blatant racism and sexism. It was an outward display of a mindset that in many ways has paved the way for the government shutdown we're facing now. Last week, NBC News reported that last fall, the president of the United States asked a career intelligence analyst "Where are you from?" She responded, "New York," and that should have ended the conversation.

Government shutdown begins and so does the finger-pointing
Government shutdown begins and so does the finger-pointing

WASHINGTON (AP) - Americans awoke Saturday to learn that bickering politicians in Washington had failed to keep their government in business, halting all but the most essential operations and marring the anniversary of President Donald Trump's inauguration.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.