Thunberg fires back at Mnunchin after college degree jab




Thunberg fires back at Mnunchin after college degree jab
Thunberg fires back at Mnunchin after college degree jab  

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnunchin said Thursday that teen climate change activist Greta Thunberg should get a college degree before she speaks out about fossil fuel divestment. It didn't take long for Thunberg - the 2019 Time magazine Person of the Year - to fire back on social media.

During a press briefing at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Mnuchin questioned Thunberg's credentials after a reporter asked him about her recent remarks. At a Davos panel on Tuesday, Thunberg urged public institutions and private companies to immediately stop investing in fossil fuels.

"Is she the chief economist, or who is she? I'm confused," Mnuchin said. "It's a joke. After she goes and studies economics in college she can come back and explain that to us."

Thunberg, who's taking a gap year from school to campaign for action on climate change, called him out on Twitter, saying it "doesn't take a college degree in economics" to see that "ongoing fossil fuel subsides and investments don't add up." She paired her tweet with an interactive graph showing the correlation between greenhouse gas emissions and the "carbon budget" - how much room is left before average temperatures rise to a perilous level, another 1.5 degrees Celsius.

My gap year ends in August, but it doesn't take a college degree in economics to realise that our remaining 1,5° carbon budget and ongoing fossil fuel subsidies and investments don't add up. 1/3 pic.twitter.com/1virpuOyYG

January 23, 2020

She added in another tweet: "So either you tell us how to achieve this mitigation or explain to future generations and those already affected by the climate emergency why we should abandon our climate commitments."

At her panel in Davos earlier this week, Thunberg accused politicians of all stripes of making promises but failing to deliver any results.

"Our house is still on fire," she said. "Your inaction is fueling the flames by the hour, and we are telling you to act as if you loved your children above all else."

The 17-year-old activist has also been a target of criticism from President Trump, who took a veiled swipe at her remarks when he spoke at Davos on Wednesday. Mr. Trump said it was time to reject the warnings of "prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse."


CBSN Exclusive: Separated family's emotional return to U.S.

Saudi Arabia responds to allegations of hacking Jeff Bezos' phone

Constitutional expert weighs in on impeachment trial ahead of Day 3


COMMENTS

More Related News

Climate change could make premiums unaffordable: QBE Insurance
Climate change could make premiums unaffordable: QBE Insurance
  • US
  • 2020-02-17 05:28:41Z

Australia's QBE Insurance Group said on Monday climate change could make some premiums unaffordable, especially for customers exposed to extreme weather events, and was a "material risk" for its operations across the globe. During 2019, QBE's net Australia-Pacific cost of catastrophe claims jumped to $193 million from $106 million the year before, led by unprecedented floods in Australia's north east coast and horrendous bushfires across the country's south east. The insurer said it has started to adjust its catastrophe models to factor in the expected impacts of climate change until 2100, and would assess the impact on its weather-related exposures from emissions and temperatures.

Half a million mussels cooked to death at a New Zealand beach
Half a million mussels cooked to death at a New Zealand beach

Brandon Ferguson went fishing at a beach in his New Zealand hometown. When the tide turned, he discovered hundreds and thousands of dead mussels.

Australian bushfires extinguished, but climate rows rage on
Australian bushfires extinguished, but climate rows rage on

Australia's "black summer" of devastating bushfires is finally coming to a close, but bitter arguments over how to tackle climate-fuelled disasters are raging on. "We know events like these can challenge the way we think about the world, undermine our perceptions of safety, and rupture social bonds," said disaster response expert Erin Smith. The question of what is next for Australia is already being asked, most of all of political leaders, and it is being met mostly with finger-pointing and recrimination.

Bernie Sanders pranked by Russians posing as Greta Thunberg
Bernie Sanders pranked by Russians posing as Greta Thunberg

Russian pranksters claim they called U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders pretending to be climate activist Greta Thunberg and offered Thunberg's support to his campaign. Vladimir Kuznetsov and Alexey Stolyarov, who have fooled many high-profile victims around the world, posted a recording of the phone call on YouTube on Thursday. The call itself took place in early December, but the duo decided to release it more than two months later because of Sanders' success in Iowa and New Hampshire, Kuznetsov told The Associated Press in a Skype interview.

One-third of all plant and animal species could be extinct in 50 years, study warns
One-third of all plant and animal species could be extinct in 50 years, study warns

Researchers studied recent extinctions from climate change to estimate how many species would be lost over the next 50 years.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America