The Mega Millions jackpot is at a record-high $868 million - here's which states spend the most buying lottery tickets




 

Kena Betancur/Getty Images


The Mega Millions jackpot is at a record-high $868 million, and Americans love to play the lottery.

But people living in some states spend way more than those in others.

Business Insider looked at statistics from the US Census Bureau to figure out the average amount each resident in a state spent on lottery tickets in 2016 using the Bureau's population estimates and state lottery revenue figures from the annual Survey of State Government Finances. (We were inspired by an analysis done first by LendEDU, but we did our own calculations.)

Americans living in the eastern half of the US tend to spend more than those living in the western half. Those living in the northeast specifically tend to spend more than those living in other parts of the country on a per capita basis.

Residents living in Massachusetts spend the most on lottery tickets by far at $767. West Virginia came in second place at $594, and Rhode Island was in third at $513.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, North Dakota residents spent the least at $45, followed by Wyoming at $46 and Oklahoma at $48.

Six states did not have any lottery revenues reported in the Census data: Alabama, Alaska, Hawaii, Mississippi, Nevada, and Utah. They are gray on the map.

Business Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from US Census Bureau

NOW WATCH: What marijuana looks like under the microscope

See Also:

SEE ALSO: We did the math to see if you should buy a Mega Millions ticket

COMMENTS

More Related News

Supreme Court hears dispute over Trump census citizenship question
Supreme Court hears dispute over Trump census citizenship question
  • US
  • 2019-04-23 10:26:13Z

Lower courts have blocked the question, ruling that the administration violated federal law and the U.S. Constitution in seeking to include it on the census form. The nine Supreme Court justices will hold an extended 80-minute argument session in the administration's appeal, with a ruling due by the end of June. The case comes in a pair of lawsuits by a group of states and localities led by New York state, and a coalition of immigrant rights groups challenging the legality of the question.

Justices to hear case over census asking about citizenship
Justices to hear case over census asking about citizenship

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments over the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, a question that could affect how many seats states have in the House of Representatives and their share of federal dollars over the next 10 years.

Can the 2020 census ask about U.S. citizenship? Supreme Court hears controversial case today
Can the 2020 census ask about U.S. citizenship? Supreme Court hears controversial case today

The Supreme Court considers a case that will determine if the Trump administration can use the 2020 census to find out who is and isn't a citizen.

Companies warn Trump: Census citizenship question could be costly
Companies warn Trump: Census citizenship question could be costly
  • US
  • 2019-04-22 12:06:02Z

(This April 17 story corrects the tenth paragraph to show DeVere Kutscher is no longer executive director of the Census Business Coalition.) By Lauren Tara LaCapra NEW YORK (Reuters) - An array of U.S. companies have told the Trump administration that a citizenship question on the 2020 Census would harm business if it leads to an undercount of immigrants, undermining the data they use to place stores, plan inventory and plot ad campaigns. Corporate executives, lobbyists and representatives from major industry groups like the Chamber of Commerce, the National Retail Federation and the International Council of Shopping Centers have raised the issue in meetings with government officials,...

Where are the non-citizens? The Trump administration wants to know down to the block level
Where are the non-citizens? The Trump administration wants to know down to the block level

The Trump administration wants a citizenship question on the 2020 decennial census but critics say it could hurt minority communities like Doral, Fla.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.