The Latest: Trump says he's learned a lot about Washington




 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Latest on President Donald Trump(all times local):

12:15 a.m.

President Donald Trump says he's learned a lot about Washington, partly by getting to know members of Congress. Asked whether he has any regrets over his first 11 months, he shook his head no.

The president spoke as he signed a $1.5 trillion tax overhaul that marks his first major legislative achievement. He said he ordered up the last-minute Oval Office event because news coverage questioned whether he would sign the bill into law by Christmas.

The legislation provides generous cuts for corporations and the wealthiest Americans, along with smaller ones for middle class and low-income families.

It also ends fines for people who don't carry health insurance. That's a major change but far from end of "Obamacare," as Trump has suggested.

The new tax law also could swell the national debt over the next decade, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

___

11 a.m.

President Donald Trump has signed into law a $1.5 trillion tax overhaul package.

Trump touted the size of the tax cut, declaring to reporters in the Oval Office before he signed it Friday that "the numbers will speak."

The president said he was going to wait to sign it until after Jan. 1 but changed his mind.

The legislation provides generous cuts for corporations and the wealthiest Americans and smaller ones for the middle class and low-income families.

It is the first major overhaul of the nation's tax laws since 1986, but far from the largest tax cuts in American history as the president claims. Politically, it marks the Republicans' first major legislative accomplishment of Trump's presidency.

___

10:30 a.m.

President Donald Trump says he's getting ready to sign into law a $1.5 trillion tax overhaul package. It provides generous cuts for corporations and the wealthiest Americans and smaller ones for the middle class and low-income families.

Trump tweeted that he'll sign the law in the Oval Office before jetting off to his Florida estate for Christmas.

It is the first major overhaul of the nation's tax laws since 1986, but far from the largest tax cuts in American history as the president claims. Politically, it marks the Republicans' first major legislative accomplishment of Trump's presidency.

Some estimates say the cuts could add to the nation's soaring deficit.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Schumer takes back wall offer in new immigration push
Schumer takes back wall offer in new immigration push

WASHINGTON (AP) - Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer has taken back his offer of billions of dollars for President Donald Trump's long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall.

US Attorney General Sessions questioned in Russia probe
US Attorney General Sessions questioned in Russia probe

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions was questioned last week for several hours by investigators probing possible collusion between Russia and President Donald Trump's election campaign, the Justice Department confirmed Tuesday. Sessions, who like Trump has repeatedly downplayed the idea that Russian

Back to work: Government shutdown ends after Dems relent
Back to work: Government shutdown ends after Dems relent

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump signed a bill reopening the government late Monday, ending a 69-hour display of partisan dysfunction after Democrats reluctantly voted to temporarily pay for resumed operations. They relented in return for Republican assurances that the Senate will soon take up

Democrats, GOP hold out hope for ending government shutdown
Democrats, GOP hold out hope for ending government shutdown

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump's budget director is holding out hope that feuding Democrats and Republicans in Congress can reach a short-term spending agreement before the start of the workweek Monday, but he worries that the government shutdown could last for several more days if progress

Trump: Senate should change rules if shutdown stalemate continues
Trump: Senate should change rules if shutdown stalemate continues
  • US
  • 2018-01-21 15:01:08Z

By Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Sunday that if the government shutdown stalemate continued, Republicans should fund the government by changing Senate rules, which currently require a super-majority for appropriations bills to pass. "The Dems (Democrats) just want illegal immigrants to pour into our nation unchecked.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.