The Latest: Pence says Mexico tariffs still set for Monday




 

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Latest on Mexican-U.S. talks on President Donald Trump's threatened tariffs (all times local):

5:20 p.m.

Vice President Mike Pence says the U.S. is "encouraged" by Mexico's latest proposals to head off U.S. tariffs by stepping up efforts to halt illegal immigration over the southern border.

But Pence says that, at this point, tariffs still are set to take effect on Monday.

He adds that tariffs will go up "if we don't see the results that we need to see."

The vice president says President Donald Trump "is going to stand firm" until what he sees as an immigration crisis is resolved.

Pence says that, among other issues, negotiators in Washington have been discussing a potential agreement to make it difficult for those who enter Mexico from other countries to claim asylum in the U.S.

Mexico has long resisted that request.

Pence spoke while traveling in Pennsylvania. He's been getting updates on the talks in Washington.

___

2:20 p.m.

The chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee says he will move to block President Donald Trump if Trump follows through on his threat to impose tariffs on Mexican imports as he tries to stem the flood of Central American migrants at the southern border.

Democratic Rep. Richard Neal of Massachusetts says the proposed 5% tariffs would hurt American workers, businesses and consumers. Neal said Trump's action "commandeering U.S. trade policy to influence border security" is an abuse of power.

He vowed to introduce a resolution of disapproval if Trump declares a national emergency and tries to impose tariffs.

Blocking the tariff would require approval in the House and Senate. It is not clear whether there is a veto-proof margin in Congress to stop Trump's action.

__

12:19 a.m.

Mexican and American officials are claiming progress in White House talks to stave off President Donald Trump's threatened tariffs. But Trump declared it was "not nearly enough" to halt the import taxes he is holding out as a way to force Mexico to stanch the flow of illegal migrants at America's southern border.

Talks were to resume Thursday.

Underscoring the scope of the border problem, the Department of Homeland Security announced separately that U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions of migrants illegally crossing the border hit the highest level in more than a decade in May.

Without a deal, the first tariffs are to go into effect next Monday. They would consist of 5% taxes on imports from Mexico, eventually increasing to 25%.

COMMENTS

More Related News

'Ashamed' Trump 2016 Voters Explain Why They're Ditching The President

Republicans who voted for Trump say they are "riddled with guilt" in the spot set to air on Fox News.

Trump Says U.S. Will Review Universities
Trump Says U.S. Will Review Universities' Tax-Exempt Status

(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump ordered the Treasury Department on Friday to review the tax-exempt status of colleges and universities, following his threats to cut federal funding to schools that do not reopen due to the coronavirus pandemic.The president's attack on institutions of higher education

Supreme Court says President Trump cannot keep tax, financial records from prosecutors
Supreme Court says President Trump cannot keep tax, financial records from prosecutors

Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance called the ruling a "tremendous victory" and emphasized he will follow the law and the facts "wherever they may lead."

Supreme Court deals Trump a defeat, upholds demand for his tax returns
Supreme Court deals Trump a defeat, upholds demand for his tax returns

President Trump claimed he had immunity from subpoenas requiring his accountants to turn over his financial records to Congress and a grand jury.

Some Republicans Have Grown Wary of Protests, Poll Shows
Some Republicans Have Grown Wary of Protests, Poll Shows

Most Americans continue to support the nationwide protests against racial injustice, but with President Donald Trump issuing an ever-more-combative barrage of attacks, new polling shows that some Republicans have grown wary of demonstrators' demands and retreated toward saying that racism is not in fact a big problem in the United States.At the start of June, many polls showed the emergence of a rare consensus around calls for racial justice and changes to policing, with a majority of Republicans joining other Americans in saying that racial discrimination is a big issue for the country.But a Monmouth University survey released Wednesday found that at the end of last month, just 40% of...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy