The Latest: NRA 'disappointed' by bump stock ban




The Latest: NRA
The Latest: NRA 'disappointed' by bump stock ban  

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Latest on the Trump administration's move to ban bump stocks (all times local):

3:55 p.m.

The National Rifle Association is "disappointed" with the Trump administration's plan to outlaw bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire continuously.

Spokeswoman Jennifer Baker says the Justice Department should provide amnesty for gun owners who already have the devices.

The Justice Department says the attachments will be banned beginning in late March under a law that prohibits machine guns. The new rule reverses a 2010 government decision that found bump stocks didn't amount to machine guns.

Baker says the regulation "fails to address the thousands of law-abiding Americans" who followed the government's previous guidance.

Bump stocks became a focal point in the gun control debate after they were used in the October 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas, the deadliest in modern U.S. history.

__

12:25 p.m.

The Trump administration has moved to officially ban bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly like automatic firearms, and has made them illegal to possess beginning in late March.

The devices will be banned under a federal law that prohibits machine guns, according to a senior Justice Department official.

Bump stocks became a focal point of the national gun control debate after they were used in October 2017 when a man opened fired from his Las Vegas hotel suite into a crowd at a country music concert below, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Trump
Trump's Biggest Move to End the 'War on Coal' Won't Rescue the Industry

(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump is scaling back sweeping Obama-era curbs on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants burning coal, his biggest step yet to fulfill his campaign promise to stop a "war" on the fossil fuel.Yet the Environmental Protection Agency's rewrite of the Clean Power Plan,

We
We'll Never Solve Immigration If We Don't Solve Climate Change

We'll Never Solve Immigration If We Don't Solve Climate Change

Nuclear changes, more troops heighten US-Iran tensions
Nuclear changes, more troops heighten US-Iran tensions

The U.S. and Iran edged toward a flashpoint Monday as Tehran announced it was breaking compliance with the accord that keeps it from making nuclear weapons and the Trump administration followed by ordering 1,000 more troops to the Middle East. The Pentagon said the deployment includes security forces and troops for additional surveillance and intelligence gathering in the region. While the number is small, it represents an escalation of U.S. military might aimed at deterring Iran and calming allies worried that transit through key shipping lanes could be in jeopardy.

US restores some aid but vows no more without migrant action
US restores some aid but vows no more without migrant action

The Trump administration said Monday it is easing previously announced cuts in hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to the Central American nations of El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala but will not allow new funding until those countries do more to reduce migrant flows to the United States. The State Department said that after a review of more than $600 million in assistance that President Donald Trump ordered in March to be cut entirely, it would go ahead with about $400 million in projects and grants that had been previously approved.

Why US-China trade war risks hurting firms in both countries
Why US-China trade war risks hurting firms in both countries

U.S. businesses are imploring President Donald Trump not to expand his tariffs to $300 billion in goods from China that have so far been spared in his trade war with Beijing. Huawei is at the heart of the trade war that Beijing is engaged in with the Trump administration, which has accused Chinese companies like Huawei of committing forced technology transfers from American companies and stealing their trade secrets.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.