The Latest: Entire California town ordered to evacuate fire




  • In World/Asia
  • 2017-10-11 22:47:37Z
  • By Associated Press
 

SONOMA, Calif. (AP) - The Latest on wildfires in California (all times local):

3:15 p.m.

Authorities are ordering all residents of the Northern California town of Calistoga to evacuate, saying "conditions have worsened."

The Napa County Sheriff's Office says in an alert sent via cellphone and email that residents need to leave by 5 p.m. Wednesday.

Earlier, officials went through the town of 5,000 people, knocking on doors to warn about 2,000 of them to leave.

Dangerous gusty winds and low moisture were forecast to reach the region Wednesday afternoon, fanning already raging wildfires.

In neighboring Sonoma County, authorities issued an evacuation advisory for the northern part of the town of Sonoma and the community of Boyes Hot Springs. By then, lines of cars were already fleeing the community.

___

1:20 p.m.

Officials say they have thousands of firefighters battling 22 blazes burning in Northern California and that more are coming from nearby states.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Chief Ken Pimlott says close to 8,000 firefighters have been deployed and are fighting the blazes by air and on the ground.

Pimlott says Oregon, Nevada, Arizona and Washington are sending firefighters and the U.S. Forest Service is sending fire engines, bulldozers and hand crews.

He also says there are concerns several fires could merge into one big blaze. The fires north of San Francisco are among the deadliest in California history.

The blazes have also left at least 180 people injured and have destroyed more than 3,500 homes and businesses. More than 4,400 people were staying in shelters Wednesday.

___

12:25 p.m.

California Gov. Jerry Brown warns that catastrophic wildfires will keep ripping through the state as the climate warms.

Brown told reporters Wednesday that more people are living in communities close to forests and brush that easily ignite because of dry weather. Blazes burning in Northern California have become some of the deadliest in state history.

He says a warming climate has contributed to catastrophic wildfires and that they will continue to happen. The governor, who's positioned himself as a leader in the fight against climate change, says residents and officials have to be prepared and do everything they can to mitigate the problem.

Brown says the federal government has pledged assistance but points out resources also are going to hurricane recovery efforts in Texas and Florida.

___

11:50 a.m.

Authorities say some of the most destructive wildfires in California's history have killed 21 people.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Chief Ken Pimlott gave an updated death toll Wednesday, calling the series of wildfires in wine country "a serious, critical, catastrophic event."

He says 8,000 firefighters are focusing on protecting lives and property as they battle the flames chewing through critically dry vegetation.

___

11:15 a.m.

Authorities in Northern California say they have discovered a body at a burned home, bringing the number of people killed by wildfires to 18.

The Yuba County Sheriff's Office said on its Facebook page that deputies found the remains Tuesday after a resident asked for a welfare check on a family friend who was missing.

The office says the body was found in the Loma Rica area, where another body was found earlier.

People have also died in Sonoma, Napa and Mendocino counties.

The fires north of San Francisco are among the deadliest in California history.

The blazes have also left at least 180 people injured and have destroyed more than 3,500 homes and businesses.

___

10:35 a.m.

Sonoma County officials say 670 people are still listed as missing from fires in California wine country.

But Sheriff Robert Giordano said Wednesday that many of those people may have been found but have not yet updated a registry of missing people.

Desperate family members and friends are turning to social media with pleas for help finding loved ones missing from the 22 fires in Northern California.

It's unclear if some of those people are actually OK.

Authorities pleaded with previously missing people to mark themselves as safe on the registry and alert authorities.

Napa County Supervisor Brad Wagenknecht says many people are staying with somebody else and haven't checked in.

___

9:30 a.m.

A California fire official says at least 3,500 homes and businesses have been destroyed by wildfires burning in Northern California wine country.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection spokesman Daniel Berlant says fire activity increased significantly overnight, destroying more buildings and leading to new mandatory evacuations in several areas.

Berlant said Wednesday that 22 wildfires are burning in Northern California, up from 17 on Tuesday.

Officials in Napa County say almost half of the population of Calistoga, a town of 5,000 people, has been ordered to evacuate. New evacuation orders are also in place for Green Valley in Solano County.

After a day of cooler weather and calmer winds, officials say low moisture and dangerous gusty winds will return to the region Wednesday afternoon, complicating firefighters' efforts.

___

8:10 a.m.

The return of cooler weather and moist ocean air is helping an army of firefighters gain ground against a wildfire that has scorched more than a dozen square miles in Southern California.

Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi says the fire has laid down significantly Wednesday due to the marine layer and the work of more than 1,600 firefighters and a fleet of aircraft.

Concialdi says the blaze is 45 percent surrounded and full containment is expected by Saturday, but commanders are holding onto resources because of forecasts for another round of gusty winds and low humidity levels starting Thursday night.

Incomplete damage assessments have now tallied 15 structures destroyed and 12 damaged, including homes and outbuildings.

All evacuations have been lifted except for certain homes in the city of Orange.

The fire erupted Monday about 45 miles southeast of Los Angeles as warm, dry Santa Ana winds swept the region. The cause remains under investigation.

___

6:45 a.m.

Animals from the Orange County Zoo are among evacuees returning home as crews get a handle on a Southern California wildfire that destroyed 14 buildings and damaged 22 others.

Evacuation orders were lifted Tuesday for thousands of people in Anaheim, Orange and Tustin. And more than 100 animals - including small birds, mammals and reptiles - were returned to the zoo within Irvine Regional Park, where flames roared on Monday.

Zoo officials tell the Orange County Register (http://bit.ly/2gcnFiK) that the remaining animals including bears and mountain lions will be brought back in the coming days.

The newspaper says the zoo had undergone an emergency drill a week before the fire, which helped the evacuation run as smoothly as possible.

Cooler, more humid air is helping firefighters tame that blaze in northern Orange County.

___

6:30 a.m.

A wildfire tearing through California's wine country continues to expand unabated, prompting authorities to order more evacuations.

The Sonoma County Sheriff's Office said Wednesday it ordered mandatory evacuations for several areas of Sonoma Valley after a blaze grew to 44 square miles (113 square kilometers).

After a day of cooler weather and calmer winds, officials say dangerous gusty winds will return to the region Wednesday afternoon, complicating firefighters' efforts.

The blaze in Sonoma County is one of a series of fires that flared up north of San Francisco on Sunday night and continue to burn with little to no containment. Seventeen people have died in the blazes, 11 of them in Sonoma County.

The fires have also left at least 180 people injured and have destroyed more than 2,000 homes and businesses.

___

12:00 a.m.

Jose Garnica worked for more than two decades to build up his dream home that was reduced to ashes in a matter of minutes by the deadly firestorm striking Northern California.

Garnica's house was among more than 2,000 homes and business destroyed by the fires that have also killed 17 people.

He moved to the U.S. from Mexico more than 20 years ago, and after saving money from his steady job with a garbage company he fixed up his Santa Rosa house with new flooring and stainless steel appliances.

All of it burned early Monday when the fires broke out. But Garnica says he's still better off than when he came to America.

The fires have scorched large sections of the state's wine country.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Missing California Hikers Found In Embrace After Apparent Killing-Suicide
Missing California Hikers Found In Embrace After Apparent Killing-Suicide

A young California couple who vanished during a hiking trip in the desert almost three months ago died in a murder-suicide near a trail, investigators said Friday.

8-Year-Old
8-Year-Old's Big Brother Details the Horrific Abuse He Suffered from Mom's Boyfriend Before His Death

In court on Wednesday, a California teen described the relentless assaults inflicted on his 8-year-old brother for months until, at last, the little boy was dead

Sonoma Sheriff Battles With ICE Over Misinformation On California Wildfires
Sonoma Sheriff Battles With ICE Over Misinformation On California Wildfires

As firefighters in Northern California battle ongoing wildfires, the Sonoma County sheriff is facing a different battle: fighting misinformation about the fires.

California Dept of Insurance estimates wildfires losses at $1.05 billion
California Dept of Insurance estimates wildfires losses at $1.05 billion
  • US
  • 2017-10-19 22:38:40Z

The California Department of Insurance said on Thursday its preliminary estimate for insured wildfire losses was $1.05 billion, based on claims received by the state's eight largest insurers, adding that it expected the numbers to rise. Insurers have received 601 claims for commercial property losses, 4,177 claims for partial residential losses and 3,000 claims for auto losses, said California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones during a media call. Since erupting on Oct. 8 and 9, the blazes in parts of Northern California have blackened more than 245,000 acres, (86,200 hectares) and destroyed an estimated 6,900 structures as of Thursday, including homes, wineries and other commercial...

List of missing people shrinking as California fires ease
List of missing people shrinking as California fires ease

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The number of people missing in the deadliest and most destructive series of wildfires in California history peaked at more than 2,000 in the hardest hit county but now stands at 50, with authorities believing nearly all of them will be found alive.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Asia

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.