The knitting website Ravelry banned support for President Donald Trump. Here's how Twitter reacted




  • In Business
  • 2019-06-24 02:06:19Z
  • By USA TODAY

A popular online knitting and crafting community has banned support of President Donald Trump and his administration, calling it a stand against "open white supremacy."

Ravelry, an online knitting community with 8 million members, according to Business Insider, is banning forum posts, projects, patterns and profiles that "constitute support for Trump or his administration."

"We cannot provide a space that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy," the website said Sunday in a blog post titled "New Policy: Do Not Post In Support of Trump or his Administration."

The new policy is outlined on the website:

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Ravelry took to Twitter to announce its decision Sunday morning. Predictably, the announcement has drawn thousands of replies.

Some have been in favor:

Others denounced the decision:

A message to Ravelry seeking comment was not immediately returned on Sunday. In its blog post, Ravelry said it took cues from gaming website RPG.net when crafting its policy banning pro-Trump talk.

Ravelry also noted those who have purchased patterns from the website will still be able to access those patterns. The website also included a promise that project data wouldn't be deleted.

Ravelry is "a place for knitters, crocheters, designers, spinners, weavers and dyers to keep track of their yarn, tools, project and pattern information, and look to others for ideas and inspiration," according to the website's About Us section.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: The knitting website Ravelry banned support for President Donald Trump. Here's how Twitter reacted

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