The Bears are getting a different type of nickel cornerback in Buster Skrine




Skrine will bring a different style of nickel play to the Bears
Skrine will bring a different style of nickel play to the Bears' defense.  

The Bears are getting a different type of nickel cornerback in Buster Skrine originally appeared on nbcsportschicago.com

When the Bears' defense takes the field against Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers on Opening Night, they'll be returning 9 of the 11 starters that were part of a 2018 squad that was one of the best in Bears' history.

One of the few new faces that figure to be among the starting 11 is cornerback Buster Skrine. Gone is Bryce Callahan, who left for Vic Fangio's Denver team after spending the first four years of his career in Chicago. Though Bears' scouts have had their eye on Skrine for a few seasons now, it was his more palatable three-year, $16.5 million contract -- compared to Callahan's three-year, $21 million contract -- that finally got him in house.

"Me and Buster came out the exact same year, and I've watched him," Prince Amukamara said after OTAs on Wednesday afternoon. "He actually played with my best friend and he would always talk about how fast Buster is -- especially when Buster played gunner.

"I've always watched him, and I feel like he's very similar to Bryce [Callahan] by being quick and being active. I'm definitely happy with the pick up."

Once considered a spot to place the third-best, less-athletic cornerback, no position has seen it's value increase so dramatically over the last decade. Offenses are changing dramatically; no team saw more three receiver sets in 2018 than the Bears' defense. Per Sharp Stats, opposing offenses lined up in 11 personnel against Chicago 78% of the time. The next closest was the Chiefs at 71%, and the NFL average is 65%.

"I think nickel is a different ball game," Amukamara added. "I would say it can be one of the hardest positions on the field, just because you're on an island, but the receiver has so much room to work with. Plus, it's a lot of mental gymnastics, so you've got to know when you're blitzing, know when you're running, and so we put a lot on our nickel."

Despite not being considered part of a what teams have traditionally considered base defense, the pass-happy nature of this era in the NFL has all but mandated that nickel corners are on the field for most of the defensive snaps. It's no coincidence that before breaking his foot against the Rams in Week 12, Callahan was on pace to set a career-high in snap percentage.

"Nowadays, you see a lot more sub packages," Bears defensive backs coach Deshea Townsend said. "You're probably playing 70% in sub during a game now… Otherwise, it hasn't really changed - he just plays more. That's the thing - he is technically a starter. He's probably going to run on the field first in a lot of games, and by rule that's a starter.

"One thing about the nickel position is that you've got to do a little bit of both. You can't just go out on 3rd down and cover and run the option routes. Now they're going to hand off the ball and find out where you're at and you're going to have to make a tackle. That's the difference in the position now - it's a first and second down type of guy that has to be able to do it all."

While Skrine isn't considered as good a cover corner as Callahan, Skrine's pass rush and run defense looks pretty similar. Per Pro Football Focus, Skrine's run defense graded out significantly higher (80.7) than Callahan's (57.8).

"With Buster, it's about his playing experience," Townsend added. "He's a guy who will mix it up in the run. He can blitz, and he's reliable. He's tough."

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