The 1st and 2nd members of Congress to endorse Trump will plead guilty to federal crimes, resign




  • In US
  • 2019-12-03 05:44:47Z
  • By The Week

Rep. Duncan Hunter Jr. (R-Calif.) said Monday he will plead guilty to one count of campaign finance violations on Tuesday and hinted he will step down from Congress, typically a precondition for the type of plea deal Hunter is accepting. Hunter is the second Republican member of Congress to plead guilty to federal crimes this fall, following Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.), who pleaded guilty to insider trading charges and resigned in October. Coincidentally, Collins was the first member of Congress to endorse Donald Trump for president in 2016 and Hunter was the second.

Hunter, 42, was first elected to his San Diego district in 2008, taking over from his father, Duncan Hunter Sr., who held the seat since 1980. The Hunter dynasty almost ended in 2016 when the younger Hunter, already under indictment, narrowly won his seat against a political unknown, Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar.

Hunter and his wife, Margaret Hunter, initially pleaded not guilty to about 60 counts of campaign finance violations tied to flagrant misuse of campaign funds on personal expenses. Margaret Hunter changed her plea in June and agreed to testify against her husband. Faced with Duncan Hunter's continued denial of guilt, prosecutors disclosed more details in court filings this year, including evidence that Hunter used campaign funds to conduct extramarital affairs with at least five women, reportedly including three lobbyists and two congressional staffers.

Trump had nothing to do with the crimes to which Hunter and Collins pleaded guilty - though he did complain about their indictments. But including last month's conviction of longtime Trump adviser Roger Stone, at least six Trump campaign associates have pleaded guilty or been convicted of federal crimes - Paul Manafort, Rick Gates, Michael Flynn, Michael Cohen, and George Papadopoulos - and his current personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and other associates are in the federal barrel now, too.

More stories from theweek.com
Jimmy Carter is back in the hospital with a urinary tract infection
Republicans are leading the country to socialism
Former FBI lawyer Lisa Page is 'done being quiet' and tired of Trump's 'demeaning' abuse

COMMENTS

More Related News

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg hospitalized with infection
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg hospitalized with infection

Ginsburg's health has been the subject of conversation among court-watchers for years, and more so as President Trump's first term draws to a close.

Trump:
Trump: 'More White People' Are Killed by Cops and How Dare Anyone Suggest Blacks Have it Bad

Following weeks of nationwide protests over a spate of police killings of Black people, President Donald Trump has claimed that "more white people" actually die at the hands of law enforcement.The president made the comment after appearing to briefly lose it when asked about the hot button topic in a CBS News interview."Why are African-Americans still dying at the hands of law enforcement in this country?" host Catherine Herridge asked, prompting the president to immediately recoil."So are white people. So are white people! What a terrible question to ask," he huffed. "So are white people."Studies have shown that Black men are about 3.5 times more likely than white men to die in police...

Trump administration drops rule barring foreign students from taking online-only classes
Trump administration drops rule barring foreign students from taking online-only classes

The about-face came after a backlash from universities and state officials who said the United States should not force international students to leave.

Mount Rushmore: Isn
Mount Rushmore: Isn't it time to talk about its Native American history?​​​​​​​

As the U.S. and NFL reckon with their relationship to Native Americans, Mount Rushmore remains almost completely devoid of important history.

Leading Homeland Security Under a President Who Embraces
Leading Homeland Security Under a President Who Embraces 'Hate-Filled' Talk

WASHINGTON -- Elaine C. Duke, then President Donald Trump's acting secretary of homeland security, arrived at the Roosevelt Room, down the hall from the Oval Office, on a steamy August afternoon in 2017 expecting a discussion about Trump's pledge to terminate DACA, the Obama-era protections for young immigrants. Instead, she said, it was "an ambush.""The room was stacked," she recalled. Stephen Miller, the architect of the president's assault on immigration, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and other White House officials demanded that she sign a memo ending the program, which they had already concluded was illegal. She did not disagree, but she chafed at being cut out of the real...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US