Televangelist Pat Robertson: Alabama abortion law 'has gone too far,' is 'ill-considered'




 

Longtime televangelist Pat Robertson, who opposes abortion, criticized Alabama's near-total abortion ban that on Wednesday became the nation's most restrictive and one expected to face legal challenge.

"I think Alabama has gone too far," Robertson said Wednesday on "The 700 Club" before the bill was signed into law by Alabama's Republican Gov. Kay Ivey. "It's an extreme law.

"They want to challenge Roe v. Wade, but my humble view is that this is not the case that we want to bring to the Supreme Court, because I think this will lose."

Robertson cited the law's lack of exemptions for rape or incest and its punishment up to 99 years in prison for performing an abortion in the state.

Near-total ban: Alabama governor signs near-total abortion ban into law

25 men voted to ban abortion in Alabama: Do they reflect the rest of America?

The law, sponsored by Republican state Rep. Terri Collins, makes performing an abortion in the state a felony punishable by 10 to 99 years or life in prison. Attempting an abortion would be a felony, with a prison sentence of one to 10 years.

The only exceptions to the ban would be a threat to the life of the mother; a mental illness where a birth might lead to a woman's death or the death of her child; or in the case of fetal anomalies where a child might be stillborn or die after birth.

Where is abortion legal? Everywhere. But ...

"I think it's ill-considered," Robertson told viewers on the Christian Broadcasting Network. The televangelist continued by criticizing the Roe v. Wade decision and emphasizing the need for strict abortion laws in the country.

"But the Alabama case, God bless them. They're trying to do something, but I don't think that's the case, and I don't want to bring it to the Supreme Court," Robertson said.

Collins and other supporters of the law said it is designed to take a challenge to Roe vs. Wade to the Supreme Court.

Legal experts, however, say the court might not reverse the 1973 decision by taking up cases on strict laws like Alabama's - even with the addition of conservative justices added by President Donald Trump. Taking on cases with lesser restrictions to chip away at abortion rights is more likely, experts say.

Will it go to SCOTUS? Strict anti-abortion laws like Alabama's are aimed at Supreme Court, which may prove to be an obstacle

Contributing: Brian Lyman, Montgomery Advertiser, and Richard Wolf, USA TODAY

Follow USA TODAY's Ryan Miller on Twitter @RyanW_Miller.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Televangelist Pat Robertson: Alabama abortion law 'has gone too far,' is 'ill-considered'

COMMENTS

More Related News

Onstage, the queen of the Court reigns supreme, even in tragedy
Onstage, the queen of the Court reigns supreme, even in tragedy

The audience goes wild, but Ruth Bader Ginsburg, matriarch of the United States Supreme Court, calls for quiet. This is no time for celebration -- she is here to judge Electra, the ancient Greek tragic heroine. "I am so excited," says one audience member as she sees the progressive pop culture icon, affectionately nicknamed "the notorious RBG," enter the scene.

U.S. Supreme Court strikes down stiff firearms penalties
U.S. Supreme Court strikes down stiff firearms penalties
  • US
  • 2019-06-24 15:14:24Z

Conservative Justice Neil Gorsuch sided with the U.S. Supreme Court's four liberal members on Monday in striking down as unconstitutionally vague a law imposing stiff criminal sentences for people convicted of certain crimes involving firearms. In the 5-4 ruling, with Gorsuch's fellow conservatives in dissent, the court ruled against President Donald Trump's administration in declaring that the federal law in question was written too vaguely and thus violated the U.S. Constitution's guarantee of due process. Gorsuch, appointed by Trump in 2017, wrote that laws passed by Congress must give ordinary people notice of what kind of conduct can land them in prison.

Supreme Court limits access to government records in loss for Argus Leader, part of the USA TODAY Network
Supreme Court limits access to government records in loss for Argus Leader, part of the USA TODAY Network

The Supreme Court issued its ruling in a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit brought by the Argus Leader of South Dakota, part of the USA TODAY Network

F-word wins in Supreme Court free speech case on trademark protection for 'immoral, scandalous' material
F-word wins in Supreme Court free speech case on trademark protection for 'immoral, scandalous' material

Faced with a clothing line called FUCT, the justices struck down federal bans against granting trademark protection for immoral or scandalous material

U.S. Supreme Court takes up insurers
U.S. Supreme Court takes up insurers' $12 billion Obamacare dispute
  • US
  • 2019-06-24 13:43:41Z

The justices will hear an appeal by a group of insurers of a lower court ruling that Congress had suspended the government's obligation to make the payments. The insurers have argued that the ruling would allow the government to pull a "bait-and-switch" and withhold money they were promised. Insurers including Moda Health Plan Inc have said the government was supposed to help them recover from early losses they suffered after the passage of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, under Democratic former President Barack Obama.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.