Taiwan says shut out of U.N. climate talks due to China pressure




  • In World
  • 2017-11-14 09:56:52Z
  • By By Jess Macy Yu

By Jess Macy Yu

TAIPEI (Reuters) - Taiwan said its environment minister has been prevented from attending an annual U.N. climate meeting even with credentials as a non-governmental participant due to pressure from China.

It represents the latest case of self-ruled Taiwan not being able to take part in an international event because of opposition from China, which objects to the island it claims under its "one-China" stand being accorded anything akin to the status of an independent state.

Environmental protection agency minister Lee Ying-yuan had hoped to attend a U.N. climate change meeting in Bonn, Germany, the island's foreign ministry said in a statement late on Monday.

"Due to China's interventions, environmental protection minister Lee was unable to enter the UNFCCC meeting," it said, referring to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Relations between Beijing and Taipei have nosedived since Tsai Ing-wen was elected the island's president last year. China believes she wants formal independence for Taiwan, a red line for Beijing. Tsai says she wants to maintain peace with China but will defend Taiwan's democracy and security.

Taiwan's foreign ministry spokesman, Andrew H.C. Lee, told a news conference in Taipei the president believed climate change was an important issue and the island would endeavor to take part in international meetings to address it.

In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said China's position was very clear.

"On the matter of Taiwan participating in international events, China's position is very clear; that is, it must comply with the One China principle," Geng told reporters, without elaborating.

Organizers of the event in Bonn where were not immediately available for comment.

Since 2009, when Taiwan announced its intention to participate in U.N. climate change meetings, the government has helped officials get credentials for talks as non-governmental observers to attend the international meeting. Taiwan participated last year with a lower-level delegation.

Taiwan is not a member of the United Nations, having lost the seat it held in China's name in 1971 when the Communist government in Beijing assumed the position.

Under the previous Taiwan administration of the China-friendly President Ma Ying-jeou, Beijing let Taiwan attend some U.N.-related events, including getting observer access at the annual U.N. World Health Assembly meeting in Geneva.

This year, Taiwan was shut out of the health assembly, which the island also said was due to China's coercion and threats.

China has previously blamed Taiwan for its exclusion from international events, saying it is due to Taipei's refusal to accept the "one China" principle.

Nationalist forces, defeated by the Communists, fled to Taiwan at the end of the Chinese civil war in 1949.

(Reporting by Jess Macy Yu; Additional reporting by Philip Wen and Ben Blanchard in BEIJING, and Alister Doyle in BONN, Germany; Editing by Edwina Gibbs)

COMMENTS

More Related News

Exclusive: U.S. prepares high-seas crackdown on North Korea sanctions evaders - sources
Exclusive: U.S. prepares high-seas crackdown on North Korea sanctions evaders - sources

By Matt Spetalnick, Phil Stewart and David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration and key Asian allies are preparing to expand interceptions of ships suspected of violating sanctions on North Korea, a plan that could include deploying U.S. Coast Guard forces to stop and search vessels in Asia-Pacific waters, senior U.S. officials said. Washington has been talking to regional partners, including Japan, South Korea, Australia and Singapore, about coordinating a stepped-up crackdown that would go further than ever before in an attempt to squeeze Pyongyang's use of seagoing trade to feed its nuclear missile program, several officials told Reuters. While suspect ships...

Deaths mounts in Syria as UN weighs cease-fire resolution
Deaths mounts in Syria as UN weighs cease-fire resolution

BEIRUT (AP) - Syrian government warplanes carried out a sixth day of airstrikes Friday in the rebel-held suburbs east of Damascus, killing 32 people, activists said, as the death toll from a week of bombardment soared over 400.

Trump: Never had a better relationship with China than no...
Trump: Never had a better relationship with China than no...

At a joint news conference at the White House, President Donald Trump answers questions about General Mattis' view on China.

South Sudan military officers may have committed war crimes: U.N
South Sudan military officers may have committed war crimes: U.N

U.N. investigators said on Friday they had identified more than 40 South Sudanese military officers who may be responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity. It was a sharp departure from previous U.N. reports that documented crimes but not perpetrators. Oil-rich South Sudan gained independence from neighbouring Sudan in 2011 but slid into civil war in December 2013.

UN Security Council to vote Friday on Syria ceasefire
UN Security Council to vote Friday on Syria ceasefire
  • World
  • 2018-02-23 09:57:13Z

The UN Security Council will vote Friday on a draft resolution demanding a 30-day ceasefire in Syria to allow for humanitarian aid and medical evacuations. A slightly amended text was circulated to council members late Thursday but it was unclear whether Russia would support the measure which has been

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: World

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.