Taiwan Is Not Worth A War With China (For 1 Key U.S. Ally, That Is)




Taiwan Is Not Worth A War With China (For 1 Key U.S. Ally, That Is)
Taiwan Is Not Worth A War With China (For 1 Key U.S. Ally, That Is)  

Key Point: Taiwan puts Ameirca in between a rock and a hard place.

Paul Dibb, in his recent Strategist post, writes that America's strategic position in Asia would be fatally undermined if it didn't go to war with China if China attacked Taiwan, and that Australia's alliance with America would be fatally undermined if we didn't then go to war with China too. The conclusion he draws is that, in the event of an unprovoked Chinese attack on Taiwan, America should go to war with China, and so should Australia.

I think Dibb's premises are correct, but his conclusion is wrong. Failing to come to Taiwan's aid would seriously weaken and perhaps destroy America's position in Asia, and our alliance with America would be seriously weakened if not destroyed if we failed to support the US. But it doesn't follow that either America or Australia should therefore go to war with China to defend Taiwan.

That depends on who would win the war. Such a war, like any war, would be a calculus of uncertainties, but at the very least one could say that a swift, cheap and decisive US victory over China would be very unlikely. America's military power is very great, but China's military power, and especially its capacity to deny its air and sea approaches to US forces, has grown sharply, and is now formidable.

Read the original article.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Trump blasts proposed restrictions on China trade, wants China to buy U.S. jet engines
Trump blasts proposed restrictions on China trade, wants China to buy U.S. jet engines

U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday blasted proposed restrictions on trade with China and said national security cannot be used as an "excuse" to make it difficult for foreign countries to buy U.S. products. The series of tweets was an apparent reference to reports over the weekend that the U.S. government is considering whether to block General Electric Co from continuing to supply engines for a new Chinese passenger jet. Washington is also eyeing limits on other components for Chinese commercial aircraft such as flight control systems made by Honeywell International Inc .

China reports 1,886 new virus cases, death toll up by 98
China reports 1,886 new virus cases, death toll up by 98
  • World
  • 2020-02-18 02:44:15Z

China reported 1,886 new virus cases and 98 more deaths in its update Tuesday on a disease outbreak that has caused milder illness in most people, an assessment that promoted guarded optimism from global health authorities. The update raised the number of deaths in mainland China to 1,868 and the total confirmed cases to 72,436. Monday's report gives the World Health Organization a clearer picture of where the outbreak is headed, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a news conference.

Top disease official: Risk of coronavirus in U.S. is
Top disease official: Risk of coronavirus in U.S. is 'minuscule,' skip mask and wash hands

Should I wear a mask? The U.S. infectious disease chief says no: "In the U.S. there is absolutely no reason whatsoever to wear a mask right now."

Chinese President Xi knew severity of coronavirus weeks before going public; 40 Americans on cruise ship infected
Chinese President Xi knew severity of coronavirus weeks before going public; 40 Americans on cruise ship infected

President Xi Jinping published a timeline of his actions as the Communist Party worked to tamp down criticism of government handling of the crisis.

'Animals live for man': China's appetite for wildlife likely to survive virus

HONG KONG/BEIJING (Reuters) - For the past two weeks China's police have been raiding houses, restaurants and makeshift markets across the country, arresting nearly 700 people for breaking the temporary ban on catching, selling or eating wild animals. The scale of the crackdown, which has netted almost 40,000 animals including squirrels, weasels and boars, suggests that China's taste for eating wildlife and using animal parts for medicinal purposes is not likely to disappear overnight, despite potential links to the new coronavirus. "I'd like to sell once the ban is lifted," said Gong Jian, who runs a wildlife store online and operates shops in China's autonomous Inner Mongolia region.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America