Supreme Court makes sports betting a possibility nationwide




Supreme Court makes sports betting a possibility nationwide
Supreme Court makes sports betting a possibility nationwide  

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a federal law that bars gambling on football, basketball, baseball and other sports in most states, giving states the go-ahead to legalize betting on sports.

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. The 1992 law barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions. It made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game.

One research firm estimated before the ruling that if the Supreme Court were to strike down the law, 32 states would likely offer sports betting within five years.

''The legalization of sports gambling requires an important policy choice, but the choice is not ours to make. Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each state is free to act on its own. Our job is to interpret the law Congress has enacted and decide whether it is consistent with the Constitution. PASPA is not,'' Justice Samuel Alito wrote for the court.

The court's decision came in a case from New Jersey, which has fought for years to legalize gambling on sports at casinos and racetracks in the state. Then-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said after arguments in the case in December that if justices sided with the state, bets could be taken ''within two weeks'' of a decision. On Monday, after the ruling was announced, Christie tweeted that it was a ''great day for the rights of states and their people to make their own decisions.''

It's possible that the first to market with sports betting in New Jersey will be a racetrack at the Jersey shore. Monmouth Park has already set up a sports book operation and has previously estimated it could take bets within two weeks of a favorable Supreme Court ruling.

Tony Rodio, president of Tropicana Entertainment, said his Atlantic City casino will ''absolutely'' offer sports betting once it can get it up and running. ''It's been a long time coming,'' he said.

More than a dozen states had supported New Jersey, which argued that Congress exceeded its authority when it passed the law barring states from authorizing sports betting. New Jersey said the Constitution allows Congress to pass laws barring wagering on sports, but Congress can't require states to keep sports gambling prohibitions in place.

All four major U.S. professional sports leagues, the NCAA and the federal government had urged the court to uphold the federal law. In court, the NBA, NFL, NHL and Major League Baseball had argued that New Jersey's gambling expansion would hurt the integrity of their games. Outside court, however, leaders of all but the NFL have shown varying degrees of openness to legalized sports gambling.

The American Gaming Association estimates that Americans illegally wager about $150 billion on sports each year.

New Jersey has spent years and millions of dollars in legal fees trying to legalize sports betting at its casinos, racetracks and former racetracks. In 2012, with voters' support, New Jersey lawmakers passed a law allowing sports betting, directly challenging the 1992 federal law which says states can't ''authorize by law'' sports gambling. The four major professional sports leagues and the NCAA sued, and the state lost in court.

In 2014, New Jersey tried a different tactic by repealing laws prohibiting sports gambling at casinos and racetracks. It argued taking its laws off the books was different from authorizing sports gambling. The state lost again and then took the case to the Supreme Court.

---

Associated Press reporter Wayne Parry contributed reporting from Atlantic City, New Jersey.

---

Follow Jessica Gresko on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jessicagresko

COMMENTS

More Related News

The Senate Judiciary Committee's Only 4 Women Reflect On Kavanaugh's Confirmation
The Senate Judiciary Committee's Only 4 Women Reflect On Kavanaugh's Confirmation

The only four female members of the Senate Judiciary Committee are angry that

Trial opens on claim Harvard discriminates against Asian-Americans
Trial opens on claim Harvard discriminates against Asian-Americans
  • US
  • 2018-10-15 10:02:27Z

Harvard University is set to face trial on Monday over accusations that it discriminates against Asian-American applicants in a closely watched lawsuit that could influence the use of race as a factor in college admissions decisions. The non-jury trial before U.S. District Judge Allison Burroughs in Boston pits the Ivy League school against Students for Fair Admissions, an organization founded by an anti-affirmative action activist that sued Harvard in 2014. The lawsuit, backed by the Trump administration, could eventually reach the Supreme Court, giving the newly cemented five-member conservative majority a chance to bar the use of affirmative action to help minority applicants get...

Brooklyn Witches Plan to Put a Hex on Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh
Brooklyn Witches Plan to Put a Hex on Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh

A bookstore in Brooklyn is holding a public event to put a hex on newly-confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh next Saturday night. Catland Books, in the Bushwick neighborhood of the New York City borough, says that Kavanaugh will be the focus of the event, but it will curse "all rapists and the patriarchy," too. To promote the "Ritual to Hex Brett Kavanaugh," the bookstore has sent out invites over Eventbrite.

Maine faces consumer backlash after Senator Susan Collins backs Kavanaugh
Maine faces consumer backlash after Senator Susan Collins backs Kavanaugh

Businesses in Maine are facing a backlash after  Susan Collins, the state's Republican senator, decided to back the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Two of Maine's biggest industries,  lobster fishing and tourism, are facing a consumer boycott following Ms Collins' key vote in the most hotly contested appointment to the Supreme Court since that of Clarence Thomas in 1991. The state's lobster industry is already reeling because of the punitive tariffs imposed by China as a result of the trade war launched by the Trump Administration. The Senate confirmed Mr Kavanaugh by 50 votes to 48 with Lisa Murkowski, another Republican, voting against his appointment...

Trump praises McConnell
Trump praises McConnell's role in battle over Kavanaugh

President Donald Trump heaped praise Saturday on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, crediting the veteran Kentucky lawmaker's political toughness and acumen during the ugly battle that concluded with Brett Kavanaugh becoming a Supreme Court justice. "He's Kentucky tough," Trump

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.