Steph Curry hopes to change face of golf after revolutionizing basketball




  • In Sports/Golf
  • 2019-09-16 20:33:52Z
  • By NBC Sports BayArea
 

SAN FRANCISCO - On a damp Monday morning, on a golf course a few inches east of the Pacific Ocean, Stephen Curry explains his desire to go where no man or woman has gone before.

To succeed where Tiger Woods, hindered by personal priorities, did not.

Curry is committed to making golf, despite its reputation as a refuge for the elite, accessible to all. To put a finer point on it, a basketball player wants to change the face of golf.

It's a novel concept, that of an athlete - one of the greats in this instance - lifting his platform beyond the sport he identifies with and trying to make a tangible difference elsewhere. But Curry is not of a mind of waver. Even as he remains dedicated to remaining crucial to the fortunes of the Warriors, he is trying to speak his quest into existence while also financing it into reality.

"The game plan is forming as we go," Curry said Monday. "But I just get so excited about the game that I hope other people will, too."

Curry and scores of others were at TPC Harding Park for the inaugural Stephen Curry Charity Classic, presented by Workday. The goal of the event is to raise $1 million mostly for two causes: 1) PGA Reach, a charity with the stated purpose of increasing golf access to youth and military while also fostering diversity; and 2) Eat. Learn. Play., the foundation initiated by Curry and his wife, Ayesha.

The event carried enough weight to attract San Francisco Mayor London Breed, PGA of America CEO Seth Waugh and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice - as well as former Warriors forward Andre Iguodala and the team's CEO, Joe Lacob.

Curry's love for golf is on display every chance he gets. That's not enough. Upon signing a five-year contract worth $201 million two summers ago, Curry vowed to invest in specific charities and causes. He has made golf one such beneficiary.

When it announced last month that Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C., was resuming its golf program, which was disbanded in the 1970s, it simultaneously was announced that Curry was the man behind the game's return. He's making a seven-figure donation over the next six years.

"Basketball has been the best experience of my life in terms of (making) a career out of it, with all the things we've been able to do on the court," Curry said. "But understanding how things I enjoy doing in life outside of basketball, growing the game of golf, there are a lot of different ways of going about that.

"But in terms of somebody outside the normal golf voice lending time and resources and opportunities to share how much the game means to me, the people you get to play with, the places it can take you, the things it teaches you about yourself. Reaching out to underrepresented communities and people that are just looking for access to the game, get them introduced to it early and, hopefully, through their competitive experience, if that's what they want to do, provide opportunities for that."

One of the constant themes in conversation with Curry is "growing the game." And he's not talking about basketball, which is immensely popular and is represented in some form, on every continent, by practically every racial and ethnic group. Golf, however, still is beyond the reach of many, partly for financial reasons and partly because it simply intimidates those unfamiliar with an environment that can feel quite exclusive.

"We've got four pillars: kids, veterans, inclusion and a place to play," Waugh said. "We want to make a difference in all of that. Golf can be such an engine for good, and we are at the center of golf at every level, from the Ryder Cup to the PGA Championship. We have the opportunity to touch the most people. We want to shepherd that into those pillars, which are needed to evolve the game and make it more relevant to the next generation. We need to make it a game for our kid's kids, as opposed to protecting a game that our parents or grandparents played.

"Our ability to do that, through making the game more welcoming and accessible and understandable - along with more fun - is what this is about. It can rehabilitate kids because this is a game that can be played for life."

There was a time early in the millennium, when Tiger, with his brown face and dynamic game, was visualized as not only an ambassador but also the forerunner to many more that looked like him, even if they couldn't play like him. He opened the door, so to speak, but made only occasional attempts to invite others behind him. The faces of golf haven't changed much.

[RELATED: Check out Steph's new UA 'Range Unlimited' golf collection]

Nearly 20 years later, Curry is trying to fill that void. He's going grassroots to expose the game to those who barely know it, if at all. He has made a difference on the basketball court, and now one of his missions is to do so on the golf course.

"There are different measures that you can think about, like getting more kids involved in the game early," he says. "Or leveraging the traditional golf verticals that hopefully will get more kids competitive in the game. More representation at the early ages.

"From there ... this is a game for life. So, hopefully, my involvement in it will be for life."

Steph Curry hopes to change face of golf after revolutionizing basketball originally appeared on NBC Sports Bay Area

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