South Korea Wants Its Helicopter Carriers to Carry the F-35




South Korea Wants Its Helicopter Carriers to Carry the F-35
South Korea Wants Its Helicopter Carriers to Carry the F-35  

Key point: Seoul wants an improved power projection capability.

South Korea is getting an aircraft carrier. The vessel could help Seoul's navy to compete with its main rivals, the Chinese and Japanese fleets.

The South Korean joint chiefs of staff decided on July 12, 2019 to acquire an assault ship capable of operating fixed-wing aircraft, Defense News reported. The vessel presumably would embark vertical-landing F-35B stealth fighters.

Seoul for years has mulled a purchase of F-35Bs to complement the country's land-based F-35As.

"The plan of building the LPH-II ship has been included in a long-term force buildup plan," a spokesman for the joint chiefs told Defense News, using an acronym for "landing platform helicopter."

"Once a preliminary research is completed within a couple of years, the shipbuilding plan is expected to be included in the midterm acquisition list," the spokesman added.

The new LPH will displace around 30,000 tons of water, roughly twice as much as the South Korean navy's two LPH-Is displace. The older assault ships embark only helicopters. A 30,000-ton vessel easily could operate a dozen or more F-35Bs plus other aircraft.

Acquiring a carrier represents "a symbolic and meaningful step to upgrade the country's naval capability against potential threats posed by Japan and China," Kim Dae-young, an analyst with the Seoul-based Korea Research Institute for National Strategy, told Defense News.

The new flattop is part of a wider naval buildup in South Korea. The South Korean government on April 30, 2019 approved plans to acquire new destroyers and submarines for the country's fast-growing navy.

The $6-billion acquisition include three Aegis destroyers armed with ballistic-missile interceptors and three submarines equipped with their own launchers for land-attack missiles.

The new ships could help Seoul's navy to expand beyond its current, largely coastal mission. The main threat to South Korea is North Korea, specifically the North's huge force of artillery that in wartime quickly could demolish Seoul and endanger millions of people.

Read the original article.

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