Some Utah Jazz employees laid off as part of cutback across owner's businesses




 

The Philadephia 76ers came in early, trying to force 20 percent cutbacks in salaries across the franchise's staff. That lasted less than 24 hours before the backlash hit, the net worth of the team's primary owner, Joshua Harris, was trending on Twitter, and the decision was reversed.

That stopped other owners from making a similar move or laying employees off for a while, but not long after the top 100 earners at the NBA League office - including Commissioner Adam Silver - were given a 20 percent pay reduction. The worsening economic crisis caused by the coronavirus shutdown of the United States is pushing NBA owners to act.

On Friday, the Utah Jazz - owned by the Larry H. Miller Group, which in total has more 80 different companies under its umbrella - sent this message to Adrian Wojnarowski ESPN:

"Due to the impact on our customer-facing businesses from this unprecedented pandemic, the (Miller Group) …. unfortunately had to make difficult decisions to reduce a small percentage of our workforce. Over the past several weeks, we have worked to manage and reduce costs, including executive compensation, and have reached a point where we have had to say farewell to a limited number of our valued employees.

"We have connected with our associates with outplacement services and aligned them with employers who have immediate hiring needs. We remain focused on helping our communities stay healthy."

Reports out of Utah say these are layoffs that hit a lot of people and could be permanent.



It's not fair, but little is fair right now. As noted, this is not just a layoff of some Jazz employees but also people at other businesses across the Larry H. Miller company.

Expect other NBA owners to follow suit soon, too. Not all, but some. Like owners of businesses of all sizes, they have been both hit hard in the short term and see a looming recession beyond the coronavirus. They will be looking to save money.

Some Utah Jazz employees laid off as part of cutback across owner's businesses originally appeared on NBCSports.com

COMMENTS

More Related News

Could NBA playoffs have 1-16 seeding?
Could NBA playoffs have 1-16 seeding?

NBA commissioner Adam Silver likes the idea of 1-16 playoff seeding.

Special Report: In Oklahoma pork-packing town, COVID stirs fear, faith and sorrow
Special Report: In Oklahoma pork-packing town, COVID stirs fear, faith and sorrow
  • US
  • 2020-05-23 17:58:59Z

GUYMON, Okla./WASHINGTON - (Reuters) - Over 25 years, the massive pork plant that dominates this small city brought jobs, new residents and an economic lifeline to a slowly shrinking farming community. Attracted by relatively good wages at Seaboard Foods, immigrants like Felix and Pilar Jimenez arrived by the hundreds to slaughter hogs and process meat for shipment all over the world. The Mexican couple started work in Guymon, on the vast plains of Oklahoma's panhandle, about a year after the plant opened, followed in time by their sons Michael, now 26, and Anthony, 22.

James Harden says he wants to return to play, but
James Harden says he wants to return to play, but 'I want it to be safe'

Players want the NBA's return to be "safe" - and what's safe for one player may not feel safe to another.

UK to require employers to pay 20-30% of furloughed wage cost - The Times
UK to require employers to pay 20-30% of furloughed wage cost - The Times

The United Kingdom has drawn up plans to require employers to cover 20% to 30% of furloughed employees' wages from August to reduce the vast burden of the coronavirus crisis on government finances, The Times newspaper reported. The United Kingdom extended its job retention scheme - the centrepiece of its attempts to cushion the coronavirus hit to the economy - by four months on May 12, but told employers they would have to help to meet its cost from August. "The Treasury has drawn up plans that would require employers to cover between 20 and 30 per cent of people's wages," The Times said.

Large employers push back on U.S. healthcare mergers during coronavirus crisis
Large employers push back on U.S. healthcare mergers during coronavirus crisis
  • US
  • 2020-05-23 00:51:29Z

The Pacific Business Group on Health, whose members include Boeing, Salesforce, Tesla, and Walmart, said in a letter addressed to congressional leaders this week that it feared that further consolidation in the healthcare industry could lead to higher costs. PBGH said it fears these larger players will be even better positioned to buy struggling practices coming out of the crisis, raising healthcare prices for employers.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Basketball