Senior U.S. official: Russia in compliance with New START weapons treaty




  • In US
  • 2019-12-03 15:55:48Z
  • By Reuters
Senior U.S. official: Russia in compliance with New START weapons treaty
Senior U.S. official: Russia in compliance with New START weapons treaty  

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A top U.S. State Department official said on Tuesday that Russia remains in compliance with its obligations under the New START weapons control treaty, but took a hard line on overall weapons policy by saying Moscow is not complying with most other arms control obligations.

"We assess that Russia does still remain in compliance with its New START obligations, but its behavior in connection with most other arms control agreements - and not merely the ill-fated INF Treaty - has been nothing short of appalling," Christopher Ford, assistant secretary of state for nonproliferation, told a U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing.

President Donald Trump in August pulled Washington out of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF), another landmark strategic arms accord, citing violations by Russia that Moscow denies.

Ford said Russia's non-strategic arms need to be a priority in any future weapons agreement. "Russia is projected to expand its number of non-strategic weapons considerably over the next decade," Ford said.

Russia has formally proposed to the United States that the two nuclear superpowers extend their New START arms control treaty by five years, though Moscow would also settle for a shorter extension.

The New START accord, which is due to expire in February 2021, is the last major nuclear arms control treaty between Moscow and Washington. It limits the number of strategic nuclear warheads they can deploy to 1,550 each.

Russia warned last month that there was already not enough time left for Moscow and Washington to negotiate a full-fledged replacement to the treaty and that time was running out to agree on an extension.

Trump told Russian President Vladimir Putin in 2017 he thought the New START accord was a bad deal for the United States. U.S. officials have said he will only decide next year whether or not to extend the treaty.



(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Andrea Ricci)

COMMENTS

More Related News

'No choice but to act': House Speaker Pelosi asks chairmen to pursue articles of impeachment against President Trump

Pelosi's statement came shortly after Trump invited House Democrats to impeach him quickly so the country could "get back to business."

Georgia governor picks political newcomer for U.S. Senate
Georgia governor picks political newcomer for U.S. Senate
  • US
  • 2019-12-04 18:43:53Z

Georgia's Republican governor has chosen a wealthy businesswoman and political newcomer to fill an upcoming vacancy in the U.S. Senate, flouting President Donald Trump's preferred candidate in a play for moderate suburban voters. Gov. Brian Kemp formally announced his selection of Kelly Loeffler on Wednesday, pushing aside intense criticism from hard-core Trump advocates who wanted Kemp to appoint Rep. Doug Collins, one of Trump's staunchest defenders in Congress. Kemp and Loeffler moved quickly to extinguish the rebellion from the right, pitching the little-known candidate as a Trump supporter and emphasizing her rural roots.

Trump claimed he doesn
Trump claimed he doesn't know Prince Andrew. These photos say otherwise.

President Donald Trump apparently tried to distance himself from Prince Andrew, who is in hot water over his friendship with Jeffrey Epstein.

In 300 pages, House lays out evidence for Trump impeachment
In 300 pages, House lays out evidence for Trump impeachment

The House released a sweeping impeachment report Tuesday outlining evidence of what it calls President Donald Trump's wrongdoing toward Ukraine, findings that will serve as the foundation for debate over whether the 45th president should be removed from office. The 300-page report from Democrats on the

'Why are you parroting Russian propaganda?': Hillary Clinton slams Sen. Kennedy for Ukraine claim

Chuck Todd asked Sen. John Kennedy if the Senator was concerned that he had been "duped."

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US