SCOTUS: Ginsberg Is Cancer-Free but Will Miss Oral Arguments Next Week




 

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg will miss oral arguments again next week but is now cancer-free, the Supreme Court announced Friday.

"Post-surgery evaluation indicates no evidence of remaining disease, and no further treatment is required," said Supreme Court spokesperson Kathleen Arberg in a statement, which noted that Ginsburg is "on track" in her recovery from surgery to remove two cancerous spots in her left lung. The cancer was discovered during tests after a fall she took in November that broke three of her ribs.

This week, Ginsberg missed oral arguments at the Court for the first time in her over 25 years as a justice. She will work from home again next week and make decisions using briefs and transcripts of oral arguments.

The famously resilient justice survived colorectal cancer in 1999 and pancreatic cancer in 2009 and over the summer said she planned to serve "at least five more years" on the court. Her health has remained a subject of intense speculation among Court-watchers, given the possibility that she could vacate her seat and give conservatives a chance to grow their five-four majority of justices.

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