Ruth Bader Ginsburg Has No Remaining Cancer & Will Return To The Supreme Court




  • In Science
  • 2019-01-12 15:15:00Z
  • By Sarah Midkiff
 

After undergoing surgery for early stage lung cancer last month, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be returning to the Supreme Court with a clean bill of health.

"Her recovery from surgery is on track," court spokesperson Kathleen L. Arberg said in a statement, NPR reports. "Post-surgery evaluation indicates no evidence of remaining disease, and no further treatment is required."

It seems nothing can stand in the way of Ginsburg and justice. Even while recovering from surgery and absent from the bench for the first time in her 25 years in the Supreme Court, she continued to work from home, working off of briefs and transcripts. She will continue to work from home next week as she continues to recover, planning to return to the bench before the end of the month. She will sit out oral arguments at the court next week in order to rest.

The cancer was removed early after being discovered while Ginsburg was being treated for a fall resulting in three fractured ribs last November. She underwent surgery to remove one of the five lobes of her lunch on December 21 and was released on Christmas Day. The "Notorious RBG," as her fans lovingly refer to her, has a history of quick recoveries, and this time is no exception.

Last summer, Ginsburg shared that she planned to remain in her position as the most senior member of the Supreme Court for another five years. "I'm now 85," she said over the summer. "My senior colleague, Justice John Paul Stevens, he stepped down when he was 90, so think I have about at least five more years."

While this may have been the third time that Ginsburg has battled cancer, doctors are confident in her long-term health and estimate a full recovery.

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