Russia condemns UK foreign army base plans, says ready to defend interests




Britain
Britain's Secretary of State for Defence, Gavin Williamson arrives in Downing Street, London  

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia on Friday condemned British plans to open military bases in south-east Asia and the Caribbean and said it stood ready to take retaliatory measures if its own interests or those of its allies were threatened.

British defense minister Gavin Williamson told the Sunday Telegraph newspaper last month that London was working on plans to build two new foreign bases "within the next couple of years" after it left the European Union.

Williamson did not specify where the bases might be built, but the newspaper reported that options included Singapore or Brunei near the South China Sea and Montserrat or Guyana in the Caribbean.

Maria Zakharova, a spokeswoman for Russia's foreign ministry, on Friday described Williamson's comments as baffling and warned such plans could destabilize world affairs.

"Of course, Britain like any other country is independent when it comes to its military construction plans. But against the backdrop of overall rising military and political tensions in the world ... statements about the desire to build up its military presence in third countries are counter-productive, destabilizing and possibly of a provocational nature," she said.

"In the event of any measures that pose a threat to Russia's security or that of its allies our country reserves the right to take appropriate retaliatory measures."

Russia has military bases in several countries across the former Soviet Union and operates military facilities in Syria and has spoken of re-opening Soviet-era bases in Cuba and Vietnam.

(This story has been refiled to restore dropped words in final paragraph.)

(Reporting by Andrew Osborn; Editing by Tom Balmforth)

COMMENTS

More Related News

NATO prepares
NATO prepares 'defensive' response to Russia arms treaty breach

NATO will this week decide how to respond to Russia's violation of a key Cold War arms treaty, alliance chief Jens Stoltenberg said Tuesday, insisting any measures would be defensive. The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty is expected to formally collapse on August 2 after both Russia and the United States pulled out, dealing a blow to international arms control efforts. Stoltenberg said there was "no indication" the Kremlin was prepared to destroy a missile system the West says breaches the INF and so NATO defence ministers will use talks on Wednesday and Thursday to agree countermeasures.

NATO to endorse measures against Russia over missile treaty
NATO to endorse measures against Russia over missile treaty
  • US
  • 2019-06-25 13:28:35Z

NATO defense ministers are set to endorse a list of measures that could be used against Russia should it refuse to comply with a major Cold War-era missile treaty, the military alliance's secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, said Tuesday. In February, the United States began the 6-month process of withdrawing from the landmark 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty agreed with the then Soviet Union, blaming Russia for refusing to comply with the pact. The INF treaty will end unless Russia changes its mind by August 2, and NATO ministers are weighing what steps to take in response.

Russian, North American astronauts return to earth
Russian, North American astronauts return to earth

The first crew to blast off to the International Space Station following a launch accident that deepened doubts over Russia's space programme returned to earth safely on Tuesday. NASA astronaut Anne McClain, veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos, and Canadian Space Agency record-holder David

What
What's an advanced Russian warship doing in Havana harbor?

One of the Russian navy's most advanced warships entered Havana's harbor Monday and docked at the port used until this month by U.S. cruise lines. Here are some questions and answers about the Admiral Gorshkov's travels through the Caribbean. WHAT IS THE ADMIRAL GORSHKOV?

No evidence Russia influenced Brexit via Facebook, says Clegg
No evidence Russia influenced Brexit via Facebook, says Clegg
  • US
  • 2019-06-24 08:45:30Z

There is "absolutely no evidence" that outside forces such as Russia used Facebook to target users and influence Britain's vote to leave the European Union, the world's biggest social network said on Monday. Nick Clegg, head of global affairs at Facebook and Britain's former deputy prime minister, said the network had run two full analyses of its data held in the run up to the 2016 referendum and found no evidence of a significant attempt by outside forces to influence the outcome.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.