Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation




Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley: Trump has failed to justify ouster of watchdogs, fueling political speculation  

WASHINGTON - A top Senate Republican said the Trump administration has failed to justify the ouster of two government watchdogs and suggested the vague rationale would fuel speculation that "political" motivations are at play.

The unusual rebuke - from Sen. Chuck Grassley, an Iowa Republican who has long supported government whistleblowers - comes amid intense congressional scrutiny of President Donald Trump's decision to fire Steve Linick, the State Department's inspector general, on May 15. Trump said he removed Linick at the urging of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Linick was investigating two matters that touched directly on Pompeo's actions: allegations that he used a State Department employee to run personal errands, and the State Department's decision to greenlight a highly controversial weapons sale to Saudi Arabia.

Grassley and other lawmakers have also raised alarms about Trump's removal of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general for the intelligence community, who informed congressional leaders about a whistleblower complaint that led to the president's impeachment.

"Without sufficient explanation, it's fair to question the president's rationale for removing an inspector general," Grassley, normally a staunch Trump ally, said in a statement Tuesday night.

The 4 ousted watchdogs: The Trump administration has recently moved to oust 4 government watchdogs. Here they are:

Grassley had demanded explanations from the White House for Atkinson's and Linick's ousters, but said the response he received from White House Counsel Pat Cipollone was insufficient. In a May 26 letter, Cipollone asserted Trump's "constitutional right" to remove the two inspector generals, who are charged with ferreting out corruption and waste inside the federal government.

"If the president has a good reason to remove an inspector general, just tell Congress what it is. Otherwise, the American people will be left speculating whether political or self interests are to blame," Grassley said Wednesday. "That's not good for the presidency or government accountability."

Democrats have opened an investigation into Linick's ouster, saying it smacks of political retaliation and suggesting Pompeo was trying quash Linick's investigations.

"Mr. Linick's firing amid such a probe strongly suggests that this is an unlawful act of retaliation," said the chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y.

Pompeo has dismissed accusations of wrongdoing and said Linick's ouster was not retaliatory.

"It's patently false. I have no sense of what investigations were taking place inside the Inspector General's Office," he told reporters during a May 20 media briefing. But moments later, Pompeo conceded that he did know about the Saudi arms probe, telling reporters he answered written questions from the IG's office.

"That was some time earlier this year, as best I can recall," he said, adding that he didn't know the scope or outcome of that inquiry.

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Grassley said Linick's replacement - Stephen J. Akard, a one-time aide to Vice President Mike Pence - has a conflict of interest because he also serves in another top role at the State Department. Trump appointed Akard to lead the agency's Office of Foreign Missions, a position he has held since 2019.

Grassley blasted the decision to put a State Department political appointee in the inspector general's office and allow him to keep both positions.

"The White House Counsel's letter does not address this glaring conflict of interest," he said. "Congress established inspectors general to serve the American people - to be independent and objective watchdogs, not agency lapdogs. That's the only way they can help drain the swamp of waste, fraud, and abuse entrenched within unelected bureaucracies."

Akard worked as an economic adviser for Pence when the now-vice president was Indiana's governor.

In the House, Engel and other Democrats have asked the State Department to turn over internal documents related to Linick's firing and called on the IG's office to share information about the investigations of Pompeo and the Saudi arms sale.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Chuck Grassley blasts Trump justification for ousting watchdogs

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