Nikki Haley Slams Iran's Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian Crisis




Nikki Haley Slams Iran
Nikki Haley Slams Iran's Role In Yemen War, Neglects To Mention U.S. Part In Humanitarian Crisis  

The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, stood before missile remnants that she claimed were covered in Iranian "fingerprints" on Thursday while laying out what she called "irrefutable evidence" that Tehran has violated its international obligations by militarily supporting rebels in Yemen.

The missile was reportedly launched at Saudi Arabia last month from an area of Yemen that is controlled by Houthi rebels, an Iranian-backed Shiite group that took control of large swathes of Yemen in 2014. Haley accused Iran of supplying the weaponry, and in doing so, defying a U.N. resolution that endorsed the Iran nuclear deal.

"It's hard to find a conflict or terrorist group in the Middle East that doesn't have Iran's fingerprints all over it," she told a news conference, vowing the U.S. will "build a coalition to really push back against Iran and what they're doing."

Pointing at part of the missile behind her, she added: "They are allowing missiles like this to be fired over to innocent civilians."

While fiercely denouncing Iran, Haley neglected to acknowledge America's own prolonged role in destabilizing the Middle East through its support of a military offensive that continues to slaughter Yemeni men, women and children.

The U.S. is a powerful international backer of a Saudi-led coalition against the Houthis that has conducted hundreds of airstrikes on Yemeni soil over the past two and a half years.

Under the leadership of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, coalition airstrikes in Yemen have killed thousands of civilians, according to the U.N., with no end to the military operations in sight. The kingdom admitted last December to using British-made cluster bombs ― known to cause mass civilian casualties and banned by more than 100 countries. Human Rights Watch also accused the coalition earlier this year of committing war crimes and carrying out indiscriminate attacks in Yemen.

The crisis has deteriorated under Saudi Arabia's month-long blockade of desperately needed aid supplies in Yemen, where nearly 70 percent of the population depends on foreign aid to survive. Some 7 million people in the country are already at risk of starvation, and nearly 1 million have been infected with cholera. The siege has pushed the war-torn country to the brink of "the largest famine the world has seen for many decades," according to the U.N.

The Saudi-led intervention began in March 2015, while former U.S. President Barack Obama was in power. His administration provided the coalition with arms and logistics support.

Washington has been an even more vocal backer of Saudi Arabia's regional policies under President Donald Trump, particularly Riyadh's hawkish posture against Iran and its allies. The Pentagon more than doubled its refueling support for the coalition over the past year, Al-Monitor reported, noting the U.S. supplied more than $1 million worth of aviation fuel.

During an official visit to Saudi Arabia in May, Trump announced a $110 billion arms deal with Riyadh, said to be the largest in American history. (According to an investigation by the Washington-based Brookings Institution, it may never come to fruition.)

Trump also expressed apparent support for Salman's recent anti-graft crackdown, which has widely been viewed as an attempt to consolidate power. Salman's sudden purge of scores of high-ranking officials came days after Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, returned from a surprise visit to Riyadh to meet with the crown prince.

In a rare rebuke last week, Trump urged Saudi Arabia to end its blockade in Yemen. "This must be done for humanitarian reasons immediately," the president said, shortly after he sparked outrage across the Middle East by officially recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

COMMENTS

More Related News

The Latest: Turkish media: Saudi consul leaves country
The Latest: Turkish media: Saudi consul leaves country
  • World
  • 2018-10-16 14:56:27Z

ISTANBUL (AP) - The Latest on the disappearance of a Saudi writer who Turkish officials fear was killed inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul (all times local):

Trump sends Pompeo to Riyadh over Khashoggi; Saudis may blame official
Trump sends Pompeo to Riyadh over Khashoggi; Saudis may blame official

Trump dispatched Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to meet King Salman over the case that has strained the Americans' relationship with the Saudis, carefully cultivated by the U.S. president. Khashoggi, a U.S. resident, Washington Post columnist and leading critic of the powerful Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, vanished after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul two weeks ago to get marriage documents. "The strong moral and legal responsibility which our father instilled in us obliges us to call for the establishment of an independent and impartial international commission to inquire into the circumstances of his death." Citing two unidentified sources, CNN said on Monday...

Trump says
Trump says 'rogue killers' may be behind Khashoggi disappearance

Trump said he spoke to the Saudi king for about 20 minutes about Khashoggi, who disappeared after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, and that it sounded like neither the king nor Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had knowledge about the incident. Turkish sources have said they believe Khashoggi was killed inside the building and his body removed, allegations that Riyadh dismisses as baseless. "I sounded to me like maybe there could have been rogue killers.

Saudi Arabia says will retaliate against any sanctions over Khashoggi case
Saudi Arabia says will retaliate against any sanctions over Khashoggi case
  • World
  • 2018-10-14 20:40:01Z

Turkey believes he was murdered and his body removed. Saudi Arabia has denied that. U.S. President Donald Trump has threatened "severe punishment" if it turns out Khashoggi was killed in the consulate, though he said Washington would be "punishing" itself if it halted military sales

Saudi threatens to retaliate against any sanctions over Khashoggi disappearance
Saudi threatens to retaliate against any sanctions over Khashoggi disappearance

Saudi Arabia on Sunday warned against threats to punish it over the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi last week, saying it would retaliate against any sanctions with tougher measures, as international criticism increased. Turkey's government believes he was murdered inside the building

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.