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17 more cases of a mysterious and deadly virus have been detected in China
17 more cases of a mysterious and deadly virus have been detected in China

Wuhan, central China, seems to be the origin point of 2019-nCov, a virus that has infected 62 patients and killed two people.

Space Force flies through Twitter flak after unveiling camo uniforms in earthy tones
Space Force flies through Twitter flak after unveiling camo uniforms in earthy tones

The newly minted U.S. Space Force unveiled its uniform on Friday - and defended its fashion statement against Twitter criticism that the camouflage color scheme should have been more spacey. Less than a month after the sixth branch of the U.S. armed forces came into existence, the Space Force showed off the utility uniform in a tweet, saying that the service's nametape and U.S. Space Command patch have "touched down at the Pentagon." The uniform will presumably be worn by thousands of Space Force personnel as they go about their duties, monitoring America's space assets from ground-based installations around the… Read More

Panicking About Your Kids and Their Phones? The New Research Says Don
Panicking About Your Kids and Their Phones? The New Research Says Don't.

SAN FRANCISCO -- It has become common wisdom that too much time spent on smartphones and social media is responsible for a recent spike in anxiety, depression and other mental health problems, especially among teenagers.But a growing number of academic researchers have produced studies that suggest the common wisdom is wrong.The latest research, published Friday by two psychology professors, combs through about 40 studies that have examined the link between social media use and both depression and anxiety among adolescents. That link, according to the professors, is small and inconsistent."There doesn't seem to be an evidence base that would explain the level of panic and...

Nike
Nike's controversial Vaporfly shoes powered the world's 2 fastest marathoners to victory. When I tried them, it felt like running on rocking horses.

The Nike Vaporfly shoes are 4% more energetically efficient than other brands. I thought I knew what to expect when I put them on, but I was shocked.

SpaceX delays dramatic Crew Dragon abort test
SpaceX delays dramatic Crew Dragon abort test

Dramatic SpaceX in-flight abort test is intended to clear the way to send astronauts to the International Space Station.

Beetles and fire kill dozens of
Beetles and fire kill dozens of 'indestructible' giant sequoia trees

Beetles and fire kill dozens of 'indestructible' giant sequoia treesDeadly interaction between insects, drought and fire damage have forced California's park officials to trigger climate crisis plans intended for the 2050s * 'This is not how sequoias die. It's supposed to stand for another 500 years'

Real-Life Iron Man? China is Developing Military Exoskeletons.
Real-Life Iron Man? China is Developing Military Exoskeletons.

With America and Russia developing exoskeletons-essentially the powered armor suits depicted in science fiction and superhero films like Starship Troopers and Iron Man-it was inevitable that China would follow suit.

A mysterious and deadly virus from China could have infected 35 times more people than official totals, scientists warn
A mysterious and deadly virus from China could have infected 35 times more people than official totals, scientists warn

Airports in the US and parts of Asia have started screening travellers from Wuhan, central China, in the hope of stopping the disease from spreading.

SpaceX gets ready to rehearse worst-case scenario for Crew Dragon spaceflights
SpaceX gets ready to rehearse worst-case scenario for Crew Dragon spaceflights

SpaceX and NASA are doing a dress rehearsal for something they hope will never happen: a catastrophic failure at virtually the worst time in the launch of a crewed mission to the International Space Station. Fortunately, the closest things to crew members on this in-flight abort test of the Crew Dragon spaceship are two test dummies, hooked up to sensors that will tell engineers how flesh-and-blood fliers would have weathered the aborted trip. If all goes well, that should take care of the final major hurdle before two actual NASA astronauts, Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, ride a different Crew… Read More

Watch live: SpaceX is about to blow up a rocket in a crucial test to show NASA that its spaceship ready to launch astronauts
Watch live: SpaceX is about to blow up a rocket in a crucial test to show NASA that its spaceship ready to launch astronauts

Elon Musk's SpaceX is going to make one of its own rocket boosters explode to prove that its Crew Dragon spaceship is ready to send people to space.

Amazon Web Services enlists AI to help NASA get ahead of solar superstorms
Amazon Web Services enlists AI to help NASA get ahead of solar superstorms

If the sun throws out a radiation blast of satellite-killing proportions someday, Amazon Web Services may well play a role in heading off a technological doomsday. That's the upshot of a project that has NASA working with AWS Professional Services and the Amazon Machine Learning Solutions Lab to learn more about the early warning signs of a solar superstorm, with the aid of artificial intelligence. Solar storms occur when disturbances on the sun's surface throw off a blasts of radiation and eruptions of electrically charged particles at speeds of millions of miles per hour. A sufficiently strong radiation blast can… Read More

US dumps huge amounts of sand on Miami Beach to tackle climate change erosion
US dumps huge amounts of sand on Miami Beach to tackle climate change erosion

Dozens of trucks have started dumping hundreds of thousands of tons of sand on Miami Beach as part of US government measures to protect Florida's tourist destinations against the effects of climate change. "We have erosion hotspots," said Stephen Leatherman, an expert on beaches and the environment at Florida International University. Leatherman -- known locally as "Dr Beach" -- said that rising sea levels, triggered by climate change, are causing the accelerated erosion of the famous beach, as well as coastal storms and in particular hurricanes.

Microsoft and Univ. of Washington join Georgia Tech team in $25M DNA data storage project
Microsoft and Univ. of Washington join Georgia Tech team in $25M DNA data storage project

The University of Washington and Microsoft will take part in a federally funded effort to develop data storage techniques using synthetic DNA. The Molecular Information Storage program (also known as MIST) was launched Thursday by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (also known as IARPA), which is within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. It's a multiyear research effort aimed at creating DNA-based storage systems that can archive exabytes of data - that is, billions of gigabytes of data - for centuries. IARPA has awarded MIST contracts to teams led by the Georgia Tech Research Institute, the Broad… Read More

Investors are pouring trillions into the alternative plastics industry - and these companies are racing to deliver
Investors are pouring trillions into the alternative plastics industry - and these companies are racing to deliver

More than $30 trillion in global investments are driving companies to innovate new forms of plastic that can be recycled over and over.

Power Line: Introducing a new clean-energy newsletter from Business Insider, and a look at the top clean-energy startups
Power Line: Introducing a new clean-energy newsletter from Business Insider, and a look at the top clean-energy startups

In our first installment, we cover the top clean-energy startups and investors, new 2019 financing figures, 2020 trends, and this week's top deals.

A mysterious virus in China is a reminder that the world isn
A mysterious virus in China is a reminder that the world isn't ready for a pandemic. Bill Gates says we should prepare for a deadly outbreak as we do for war.

The virus, which causes pneumonia-like symptoms and is in the same family as SARS, has killed a second person and spread to Thailand and Japan.

5 ways to look and feel healthier in one week, according to a nutritionist - and 5 things you should never do
5 ways to look and feel healthier in one week, according to a nutritionist - and 5 things you should never do

A dietitian and nutritionist, Andy Bellatti, has five pieces of advice to start feeling like your best self in just one week.

Study: 'Blob' of hot water killed a million seabirds in Pacific

The birds - a species known as the common murre - likely died of starvation due to the warm water, which severely disrupted the birds' food supply.

We
We're All Going to Live in Mushroom Houses on Mars

See why NASA thinks fungi are the future.

A controversial Nike sneaker worn by 2 record-breaking marathon champions is at risk of being banned. A decision may come within weeks.
A controversial Nike sneaker worn by 2 record-breaking marathon champions is at risk of being banned. A decision may come within weeks.

In 2019, 31 out of 36 major marathon podiums were claimed by athletes who'd worn Nike Vaporfly running shoes. The shoes have not been banned - yet.

Math Proves the Fastest, Most Efficient Way to Board a Plane
Math Proves the Fastest, Most Efficient Way to Board a Plane

The key: start with the slowpokes first.

Tardigrades Can Survive In Space, But They Have One Surprising Weakness
Tardigrades Can Survive In Space, But They Have One Surprising Weakness

Turns out these guys can't handle the heat.

A gut-wrenching photo of a dead turtle stuck in fishing line puts the plastic problem in stark relief. The image won a prestigious award.
A gut-wrenching photo of a dead turtle stuck in fishing line puts the plastic problem in stark relief. The image won a prestigious award.

An underwater photography competition created a new award this year. The winning image shows the deadly consequences of ocean pollution.

Is There a Hidden
Is There a Hidden 'Super-Earth' Exoplanet Orbiting Our Closest Stellar Neighbor?

A new exoplanet only 4.2 light years away would prove that there's plenty left to discover in our own cosmic backyard.

Fishermen Accidentally Catch a Secret U.S. Navy Microphone Planted on the Ocean Floor
Fishermen Accidentally Catch a Secret U.S. Navy Microphone Planted on the Ocean Floor

The EARS system was designed to record ocean sounds for undersea warfare.

An avian apocalypse has arrived in North America. Birdsong could become a rare sound.
An avian apocalypse has arrived in North America. Birdsong could become a rare sound.

The skies over the US and Canada are far emptier than they were 50 years ago. Birds are losing their habitats and suffering due to climate change.

A 17-year-old intern at NASA discovered a new planet on his 3rd day on the job
A 17-year-old intern at NASA discovered a new planet on his 3rd day on the job

Wolf Cukier, who had just finished his junior year in high school, discovered TOI 1338 b, the first circumbinary planet ever found at NASA.

Airline Cabin Waste Is Aviation
Airline Cabin Waste Is Aviation's Other Environmental Crisis

Huge amounts of plastic and food waste end up in landfill or incinerated. Some airlines are trying to tackle the problem, but it's complicated.

In Rare Good News, Australia Says Endangered
In Rare Good News, Australia Says Endangered 'Dinosaur Trees' Saved From Devastating Fires

Wollemi pines have ancestors dating back 200 million years.

The US saw 14 billion-dollar disasters in 2019 - the world
The US saw 14 billion-dollar disasters in 2019 - the world's second-hottest year ever

"The decade that just ended is clearly the warmest decade on record," NASA scientist Gavin Schmidt said.

Photos of the abandoned Fukushima exclusion zone show wild animals thriving, despite lingering radiation
Photos of the abandoned Fukushima exclusion zone show wild animals thriving, despite lingering radiation

The incident forced the evacuation of more than 150,000 people across 440 square miles, but animals near the abandoned towns seem to be thriving.

An astronaut in space photographed the giant smoke plume from Australia
An astronaut in space photographed the giant smoke plume from Australia's fires. Nearly 70% of the country is covered in haze.

Australia is battling the worst wildfires in its history. The smoke is visible from the International Space Station.

This new variety of apple has a $10 million hype machine behind it - and farmers are hoping it can save Washington
This new variety of apple has a $10 million hype machine behind it - and farmers are hoping it can save Washington's apple industry

The new Cosmic Crisp apple variety was released in December, 22 years after Washington researchers began developing it.

'Pleasantly surprised': Activists say BlackRock's climate change strategy is a good first step, but more needs to be done

It's a "major first step on climate action," but it "remains to be seen how much action will actually be taken," one activist said.

In quake-hit Puerto Rico even the bees are fleeing their homes
In quake-hit Puerto Rico even the bees are fleeing their homes

Bees have deserted up to 25% of hives in towns like Guayanilla in southern Puerto Rico after hundreds of tremors and a 6.4 magnitude earthquake rattled the area, said Hermes Conde, director of the island's Eastern Apiculture School. The quakes have shifted the position of many hives, confused returning bees and caused destruction inside the wooden boxes, he said. Thousands of Puerto Ricans are sleeping outdoors, fearful their houses could collapse in another big aftershock.

Sex delays menopause, study finds
Sex delays menopause, study finds

Women approaching menopause who have frequent sex are less likely to cross that threshold than women of the same age who are not as active sexually, researchers said Wednesday. On average, intimate relations at least once a week reduced the chances of entering menopause by 28 percent compared to women who had sex less than once a month, they reported in the journal Royal Society Open Science. "If a woman is having little or infrequent sex when approaching midlife, then the body will not be receiving the physical cues of a possible pregnancy," Megan Arnot and Ruth Mace, scientists at University College London, wrote.

Sex delays menopause, study finds
Sex delays menopause, study finds

Women approaching menopause who have frequent sex are less likely to cross that threshold than women of the same age who are not as active sexually, researchers said Wednesday. On average, intimate relations at least once a week reduced the chances of entering menopause by 28 percent compared to women who had sex less than once a month, they reported in the journal Royal Society Open Science. "If a woman is having little or infrequent sex when approaching midlife, then the body will not be receiving the physical cues of a possible pregnancy," Megan Arnot and Ruth Mace, scientists at University College London, wrote.

Purple haze lights up Arizona sky - and marijuana is behind it, county says
Purple haze lights up Arizona sky - and marijuana is behind it, county says

An eerie purple glow that illuminated early morning skies over Snowflake, Arizona, last week actually had a very simple explanation, according to county officials.

How Insects Cope With the Effects of Gravity
How Insects Cope With the Effects of Gravity

You wouldn't think gravity would be a big worry for insects. They're so small. So light. An ant that fell from a second-floor balcony and landed on its head wouldn't even get a bruise.Consequently, scientists have not concerned themselves greatly with what gravity does to insects. But a group of scientists who routinely put grasshoppers into the linear accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois decided to take a closer look.That's not as strange as it sounds. With synchrotron X-rays, you can get highly detailed images and video, so the Argonne lab is used for medicine and art and archaeology studies, as well as looking inside grasshoppers to see how their bodies work.Jon...

32 award-winning underwater photos reveal a troupe of tiny seahorses, a hot-pink sea slug, and fish living in beer bottles
32 award-winning underwater photos reveal a troupe of tiny seahorses, a hot-pink sea slug, and fish living in beer bottles

The images that took first place in the Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition showcase the beauty and drama of ocean life.

'A fundamental reshaping of finance': The CEO of $7 trillion BlackRock says climate change will be the focal point of the firm's investing strategy

"In the near future - and sooner than most anticipate - there will be a significant reallocation of capital," CEO Larry Fink said in an annual letter.

Scientists discover Earth
Scientists discover Earth's oldest solid material - stardust older than the sun

This particular sample is about 5 billion to 7 billion years old and predates the Sun, which the Field Museum says is about 4.6 billion years old.

U.S. Navy: We Have More UFO Stuff And You
U.S. Navy: We Have More UFO Stuff And You're Definitely Not Allowed To See It

The military reportedly admitted having documents and footage on a famous 2004 sighting, but it's top secret.

Exposure to flame retardants is causing US kids to lose millions of IQ points. They
Exposure to flame retardants is causing US kids to lose millions of IQ points. They're more damaging than lead or mercury.

Exposure to pesticides and flame retardants resulted in a total loss of nearly 190 million IQ points among children from 2001 to 2016.

Dynetics teams up with Sierra Nevada Corp. for NASA
Dynetics teams up with Sierra Nevada Corp. for NASA's big lunar lander competition

Alabama-based Dynetics says it's leading a team of companies proposing a crew-carrying lunar lander for NASA, in competition with other companies including Blue Origin and Boeing. One of Dynetics' partners is Sierra Nevada Corp., which is already working on a cargo-carrying space plane called the Dream Chaser for commercial resupply missions to the International Space Station. The Dynetics-SNC team-up was first reported late last week by Space News, and confirmed by tweets from Dynetics and SNC. Dynetics says other companies are on the team but has declined to identify them. NASA's human lander program is aimed at clearing the way… Read More

Meet Yusaku Maezawa, the Japanese billionaire giving away $9 million on Twitter and looking for a
Meet Yusaku Maezawa, the Japanese billionaire giving away $9 million on Twitter and looking for a 'female partner' to fly to the moon with him and Elon Musk

Maezawa says the giveaway is a "social experiment" to see if the money would make his followers happier.

Analysis: Boeing
Analysis: Boeing's new CEO plays it safe - but more will be needed to get the company flying right

Veteran aerospace executive David Calhoun took the reins as Boeing's CEO today, telling employees in a company-wide email that his top priorities are to get the 737 MAX flying again and restore confidence in the troubled aerospace giant. It was just the kind of email you'd expect Calhoun to send - and that's the problem. In the midst of what's likely to be a yearlong grounding of Boeing's most widely sold airplane, questions about other airplane programs ranging from the 777X to the yet-to-be-announced 797, and a setback to Boeing's CST-100 Starliner space taxi project for NASA, bolder action will… Read More

How
How's Your Internship Going? This Teen Found a Planet

The summer before senior year of high school can be a stressful time for a teenager. Childhood is winding down. College applications loom large. Many students are looking for an edge that will help them get into the right school. Last year, Wolf Cukier, 17, spent his summer vacation as few other rising seniors have: He helped discover a planet.Meet TOI 1338 b, the newly identified world orbiting two stars more than 1,300 light years away.Last July, just after he finished his junior year at Scarsdale High School in Scarsdale, New York, Wolf started an internship at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. His job was to scrutinize data that had been beamed back from outer...

Fossil Reveals Earth
Fossil Reveals Earth's Oldest Known Animal Guts

They say you should trust your gut, which is what Emmy Smith did when she went hunting for fossils in 2016. Smith, a field geologist, had a hunch she would find something interesting at a site north of Pahrump, Nevada, and she did. But what her gut hadn't told her was that some of those fossils would turn out to contain the oldest known animal guts on the planet."It was just really lucky," said Smith, who works at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and is part of the team that reported the find Friday in Nature Communications.The guts are those of an extinct animal called Cloudina, which looked like a worm made of a stack of ice cream cones and lived about 550 million years...

Scientists Warn Almond Milk Is Destructive for the Environment
Scientists Warn Almond Milk Is Destructive for the Environment

Billions and billions of bees are dying at the hands of the almond industry.


Releasing rescued orangutans into the wild doesn’t boost populations

Orangutan orphanages nurse animals back to health and release them into the wild, but that doesn’t seem to increase the population of these endangered apes

Scientists made a bow tie-shaped molecule and it changes colour

A molecule shaped like a bow tie changes colour in the presence of toxic chemicals, which could make it useful for monitoring air

A special kind of nose cell may trigger allergic reactions

Mice have thousands of allergen-sensing nose cells, a discovery which may offer clues as to why some people with allergies lose their sense of smell

Watch the first ever video of a chemical bond breaking and forming

A chemical bond between two metal atoms has been filmed breaking and forming for the first time – something scientists say they only dreamed of seeing

Benzodiazepine prescriptions reach ‘disturbing’ levels in the US

Addictive benzodiazepines are prescribed at 66 million doctor appointments a year in the US – often with opioids, making it easier to fatally overdose

The Goop Lab on Netflix shows how easy it is to fall for bad science

Instead of turning off Gwyneth Paltrow’s new alternative health Netflix series The Goop Lab, we should watch it for lessons in how to spot bad science, says Clare Wilson

Chinese Chang’e 4 engineer explains how to garden on the moon

The brains behind the first plant ever to germinate on the moon explains how the Chinese mission succeeded

Microsoft says it will cut emissions to be carbon negative by 2030

Microsoft says that by 2030 it will remove more carbon from the environment than it emits, and by 2050 it plans to offset all emissions the firm has made since 1975

We’ve seen wolf pups play fetch just like dogs for the first time

Wolf pups have been seen playing fetch with humans, a behaviour we thought was unique to domesticated dogs

Ancient shark used its teeth like the blade of a power tool

The extinct shark Edestus used its teeth like saw blades, sliding them past each other like a power tool to slice through the soft flesh of its prey

AI suggests Earth has had fewer mass extinctions than we thought

The late Devonian mass extinction around 375 million years ago may not have really happened, according to an analysis using machine learning

A robot equipped with real pigeon feathers flies like a living bird

Pigeons feathers are remarkably complex and understanding how they work has led to the first robot that flies like a pigeon, dubbed PigeonBot

Mysterious drone swarms flying at night are baffling US authorities

Swarms of drones have been seen flying over Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming in the past few weeks, but no one has claimed responsibility

Swapping breakfast for brunch on weekends may lead to weight gain

Eating later meals at the weekend may cause us to put on weight because our metabolisms are used to processing food at the same times each day

Uploading your brain will leave you exposed to software glitches

Think a digital version of your mind will allow you to live forever? It might, but it will also open you up to software manipulation and server problems, says Annalee Newitz

Marine heatwave known as 'the blob' killed a million US seabirds

A million seabirds that died along the US west coast between 2015 and 2016 were likely the victims of an unprecedented marine heatwave in the Pacific called "the Blob"

Living 'concrete' made from bacteria used to create replicating bricks

Buildings may one day be made using a strain of bacteria that creates a concrete-like material when combined with sand and nutrients

Forget exercise and diet fads – this is the secret of a healthy life

New Scientist columnist Graham Lawton has just written a scientific guide to healthy diet, sleep and exercise – and says the evidence for what works is crystal clear

Weird dust balls seen impossibly close to our galaxy’s huge black hole

At the centre of our galaxy, six strange clouds that look like dust and gas orbit a black hole so closely that if they were really just clouds they should have been sucked in by now

Strange spider-shaped microorganisms could be our distant ancestors

Since the discovery of Asgard archaea in 2015, evidence has mounted that these peculiar single-celled organisms could be the source of all complex life – including us

DeepMind found an AI learning technique also works in human brains

Researchers at tech firm DeepMind have found that a learning technique used by AI is also used by dopamine neurons in the brain

Australia's fire-driven storms are pumping smoke into the stratosphere

Thunderstorms generated by the Australian bushfires are very likely to have pumped as much smoke into the stratosphere as a volcanic eruption

What it’s like to trip on psilocybin for a scientific research study

The psychoactive compound psilocybin may hold promise for treating depression, but how do we know it’s safe? Sam Wong volunteered for a study to find out

Exclusive: UK considering ambitious new climate plan soon after Brexit

The UK government is considering a new, more ambitious blueprint to reduce its carbon emissions after the country leaves the European Union at the end of the month

What are the ethics of CGI actors – and will they replace real ones?

James Dean is set to be the latest actor to star in a film long after his death, but the rise of true Hollywood immortality raises big ethical questions

Miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy may trigger PTSD and depression

Around one in six women who experience early pregnancy loss have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety or depression nine months later

Your microbiome reveals more about your health than your genes do

The microbes that live inside you say more than your genes do about your likelihood of developing health conditions ranging from asthma to cancer and schizophrenia

Strange particles found in Antarctica cannot be explained by physics

A NASA science balloon picked up two high-energy particles and a new analysis reveals they cannot be explained by the standard model of particle physics

Analysis confirms that climate change is making wildfires worse

The extreme wildfires in Australia could become the new normal, as climate change is increasing the risk of weather conditions that lead to more severe fires

Machine seems to repair human livers and keep them alive for a week

Donated human livers can be kept alive for seven days in a new machine. The device also seems to boost organ health and may enable more people to get transplants

Captured carbon dioxide could be used to help recycle batteries

We have to capture carbon dioxide to slow climate change, but instead of simply burying it we could first use it to extract useful metals from old electrical equipment

A single star has let us put a date on our galaxy’s last cosmic meal

The Milky Way ate another galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus, and the waves passing through a star have shown us that it happened at most 11.6 billion years ago

Climate change-related injuries will kill thousands in the US

The US may see 2000 extra deaths a year from drowning, car accidents and other injuries because of climate change, with young men most likely to be affected

A smart jumpsuit filled with sensors can track babies’ development

A smart jumpsuit for babies can monitor their movement, and may be able to help spot any potential mobility issues early on

Half a million people at risk from volcano eruption in the Philippines

Taal volcano, situated on an island in a lake, began erupting dramatically on Sunday, prompting an evacuation order for 450,000 people in the surrounding area

Majority of women who have an abortion don’t regret it five years on

A survey of US women found half said the decision to have an abortion was difficult, but five years later most felt positive or no emotion about it

Analysis of CRISPR baby documents reveals more ethical violations

The controversial CRISPR baby experiment would have been unethical even if the aim wasn't to create the first ever gene-edited children, an analysis of project documents reveals

US Army has built a device to keep your hands warm without gloves

The US Army has built a prototype device that allows wearers to go glove-free in freezing conditions. It works by heating the forearm, which helps keep the fingertips warm

Mummified skin suggests duck-billed dinosaurs were grey like elephants

The mummified remains of a duck-billed dinosaur contain a grey pigment, suggesting it was grey, although other pigments may have been lost during fossilisation

Area of Amazon affected by wildfires predicted to grow by 2050

Wildfires in the Amazon in Brazil are projected to worsen, with double the amount of an important region of forest affected by 2050

We can't use genetics to predict how well children will do at school

It is claimed so-called polygenic scores for education could help teachers, but a large study shows they don't reveal anything useful about individuals

Can we really save the planet by making food 'from air' without farms?

A TV documentary claims we can save the world’s wildlife by turning solar energy directly into food and rewilding farms

23andMe has sold the rights to develop a drug based on its users’ DNA

Consumer genomics firm 23andMe has signed its first deal to sell the rights to develop a new drug for inflammatory diseases to a pharmaceutical company

Humans are cooling down so average body temperature is no longer 37°C

Everybody knows that the normal human body temperature is 37°C, but that hasn’t been true since the 19th century

Trippy maths program could help figure out the shape of the universe

Mathematicians have come up with a way to explore strange 3D spaces that could be related to the shape of the universe

Plants are growing higher up Mount Everest as the climate warms

There are more plants living high on the slopes of the Himalayas than there were 25 years ago – and the new vegetation could affect the flow of vital rivers

Ancient humans were weirdly slow to cross from mainland Asia to Java

Homo erectus probably only arrived on Indonesia about 1.3 million years ago, even though they were widespread in Asia hundreds of thousands of years earlier

Scientists have discovered five new species of songbird in Indonesia

Five species of songbird and five subspecies have been discovered by scientists for the first time in mountainous areas of Indonesia

China has developed the world’s first mobile quantum satellite station

China has connected the world’s first portable ground station for quantum communication to the Mozi satellite, and has plans to launch more quantum satellites soon

African grey parrots are smart enough to help a bird in need

African grey parrots are the first bird to pass a test that requires them to understand when another animal needs help and to provide it, something chimps and gorillas have failed to do

Top News: Science