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How beavers are reviving wetlands
How beavers are reviving wetlands

Wetlands are being lost at a faster rate than forests, but in some regions beavers are part of the solution.

Cambridge congestion charge: MPs clash in BBC Politics East debate
Cambridge congestion charge: MPs clash in BBC Politics East debate

Congestion charge plans for Cambridge have divided the city, a BBC Politics East debate is told.

Warwick Council joins farmers to plant trees in their thousands
Warwick Council joins farmers to plant trees in their thousands

More than 6,000 trees are to be planted across farms and hedgerows in Warwick.

Digging for Britain: Prehistoric find shines light on Neolithic life
Digging for Britain: Prehistoric find shines light on Neolithic life

The discovery of two Stone Age homes are helping experts understand Foyle valley's early settlers.

Orca whales were discovered with a toilet paper chemical in their livers and skeletal muscles. It
Orca whales were discovered with a toilet paper chemical in their livers and skeletal muscles. It's just the 'tip of the iceberg' for one of the most contaminated marine mammals in the world.

The contaminants add to a long list of chemicals found in Southern Resident and Bigg's orcas, both of which are at risk of extinction.

Are You (Still) an Optimist? These Questions Might Help Explain Why
Are You (Still) an Optimist? These Questions Might Help Explain Why

Imagine you're back in high school - fluorescent lights humming, hard plastic chairs, a classroom stuffy with hormones and anxiety - and you've just aced a...

Bigger, faster, farther: A batch of new rockets is set to blast into space this year
Bigger, faster, farther: A batch of new rockets is set to blast into space this year

From SpaceX's Starship to United Launch Alliance's Vulcan Centaur to Arianespace's Ariane 6 rocket, here are some of the boosters that could debut in 2023.

Suffolk Owl Sanctuary pair fly down
Suffolk Owl Sanctuary pair fly down 'wedding aisle' after rescue

Tawny owls Snowball and Wotsit bonded at a sanctuary while recuperating from traffic injuries.

The green comet and Mars will appear side-by-side next weekend. Spot them together in the sky.
The green comet and Mars will appear side-by-side next weekend. Spot them together in the sky.

A green comet and the red planet will debut in a colorful showdown next weekend. You can easily find them in the sky, or watch online.

Some Neanderthals couldn
Some Neanderthals couldn't smell their own stink, suggests a new study recreating early humans' noses

Understanding what early humans smelled can offer better context for our own sense of smell, and give us a sniff of life at our origins.

Dartmoor Zoo set for £130,000 energy bill increase
Dartmoor Zoo set for £130,000 energy bill increase

The zoo is looking at alternative options, such as renewable energy, to tackle rising costs.

Over 200 years after Waterloo, bones of slain soldiers remain a mystery
Over 200 years after Waterloo, bones of slain soldiers remain a mystery

The June 18, 1815, clash ended Napoleon Bonaparte's ambitions of conquering Europe, and resulted in the deaths of around 20,000 soldiers.

Butterflies in major decline in Northern Ireland, says report
Butterflies in major decline in Northern Ireland, says report

Several species of butterfly are struggling and scientists are warning that time is running out.

World Wetlands Day: Events to be held in Alderney and Herm
World Wetlands Day: Events to be held in Alderney and Herm

People are invited to learn about a range of marine life for World Wetlands Day 2023.

What can Cambridge learn from Gothenburg
What can Cambridge learn from Gothenburg's congestion charge?

Cambridge hopes a congestion charge will cut traffic by 50%. What does Gothenburg have to say?

Scientists hope lab-grown coral can save endangered Florida Keys reef
Scientists hope lab-grown coral can save endangered Florida Keys reef

An outbreak of stony coral tissue loss disease threatens to destroy 20 of the 45 species in the world's third-largest coral reef.

How do you make a mummy? Ancient Egyptians
How do you make a mummy? Ancient Egyptians' surprising formulas revealed

The discovery of an unusual set of ceramic vessels has shed new light on the mummification process in ancient Egypt, according to a new study.

Racial disparities can affect brain development in Black children, new study finds
Racial disparities can affect brain development in Black children, new study finds

Structural racism creates barriers in housing, employment and economic opportunity for Black people and other people of color.

Britain
Britain's ugliest dog Peggy gets prize-winning makeover

Four-year-old Peggy enjoys a grooming session in Beverley after being named ugliest dog in Britain.

Cranes: Survey reveals UK
Cranes: Survey reveals UK's tallest bird is making wetland comeback

The RSPB warns that changing legislation could see laws protecting wetland habitats weakened.

Video: Watch 2 astronauts spacewalk today to prep solar arrays that will boost the space station
Video: Watch 2 astronauts spacewalk today to prep solar arrays that will boost the space station's power supply

The live feed, provided by NASA, shows astronauts Nicole Mann and Koichi Wakata performing the second spacewalk of 2023.

Tiphaine Louradour launches a new stage of her career as CEO of Spaceflight Inc.
Tiphaine Louradour launches a new stage of her career as CEO of Spaceflight Inc.

Space industry veteran Tiphaine Louradour is taking the helm as CEO of Spaceflight Inc., a launch and in-space transportation services provider based in...

Bird flu: What is it and what
Bird flu: What is it and what's behind the outbreak?

Why is bird flu so bad this year and why are scientists so concerned?

World
World's oldest preserved brain found in prehistoric fish fossil

The "unexpected" discovery came to light when a 319 million-year-old fossilised fish was scanned.

Prince of Wales fund: Salisbury Plantlife charity given £390,000
Prince of Wales fund: Salisbury Plantlife charity given £390,000

The grant will help Wiltshire based charity Plantlife research and protect nature in local areas.

Northern Ireland conservation: More than 100 species added to priority list
Northern Ireland conservation: More than 100 species added to priority list

The kingfisher and bog orchid join almost 600 other NI species highlighted for conservation.

Final slice of Langholm Moor sold to conservation firm
Final slice of Langholm Moor sold to conservation firm

One of Scotland's biggest landowners has agreed the sale of thousands of acres near Langholm.

Mudlarker discovers cup in Thames that may be rare Roman find
Mudlarker discovers cup in Thames that may be rare Roman find

Malcom Russell says archaeologists have told him the cup might date back to the 2nd Century AD.

Why have there been no named winter storms this year?
Why have there been no named winter storms this year?

The UK hasn't seen a single named storm so far this autumn and winter. But why?

Horses and dogs sailed with Vikings to Britain, say scientists
Horses and dogs sailed with Vikings to Britain, say scientists

A Viking leader probably chose his favourite animals to board a longboat to England, scientists say.

A look at the new AP curriculum for African American Studies
A look at the new AP curriculum for African American Studies

The course was first announced last August but the final framework was released on Wednesday.

Sex drive and lack of sleep may be killing endangered quolls
Sex drive and lack of sleep may be killing endangered quolls

The male northern quoll, a small endangered marsupial, is walking so far and sleeping so little in its desperate search for sex that it may be causing its...

A scientist is using AI to design a nasal spray that could protect us from the flu, COVID, and colds
A scientist is using AI to design a nasal spray that could protect us from the flu, COVID, and colds

A researcher is working on a nasal spray to protect against COVID-19. He thinks a similar tool could protect against the flu and colds as well.

Being in a Tesla helped save the 4 people who plunged 250 feet off a cliff, expert says. That and a lot of luck.
Being in a Tesla helped save the 4 people who plunged 250 feet off a cliff, expert says. That and a lot of luck.

Tesla's above-and-beyond safety design increased the family's chance of surviving the crash, said a forensic engineer who studied crashes.

Fears bottle return scheme will not be ready by August deadline
Fears bottle return scheme will not be ready by August deadline

The scheme is due to launch in August but businesses say they have not received key information.

Gwynedd: Bin collectors seen tossing recycling into rubbish bins
Gwynedd: Bin collectors seen tossing recycling into rubbish bins

The council says it is investigating the incident which a resident claims involved 20 homes.

Billion-dollar startup plans to bring the dodo back from the dead, and claims it can also revive the woolly mammoth
Billion-dollar startup plans to bring the dodo back from the dead, and claims it can also revive the woolly mammoth

Colossal Biosciences aims to use gene editing to recreate extinct animals, which it says is important because biodiversity is dwindling.

Sex and no sleep may be killing endangered quolls
Sex and no sleep may be killing endangered quolls

New research has found that lack of rest could explain why males of the species mate themselves to death.

Somerset student to take electric powerboat around UK
Somerset student to take electric powerboat around UK

Harry Besley wants to raise awareness of how electric engines can reduce pollution.

Corby: Roman tiles found at Priors Hall Park question worker theory
Corby: Roman tiles found at Priors Hall Park question worker theory

A woman's sandal imprint and a written name are found on Roman tiles dug up in Northamptonshire.

20 years after Columbia disaster, NASA remembers crew and lessons learned
20 years after Columbia disaster, NASA remembers crew and lessons learned

Columbia's destruction and the loss of its crew triggered a sharp change of course for America's space program.

Newly discovered green comet comes close to Earth
Newly discovered green comet comes close to Earth

The cosmic ball of ice and dust is about to make its closest approach to our planet.

Race to vaccinate rare wild monkeys gives hope for survival
Race to vaccinate rare wild monkeys gives hope for survival

In a small lab nestled in Brazil's Atlantic Forest, researchers with gloved hands and masked faces cradle four tiny golden monkeys so a veterinarian can...

Auckland weather: Flood-hit region suffers more heavy rain
Auckland weather: Flood-hit region suffers more heavy rain

Only days after deadly floods killed four in Auckland, severe weather once again hit the region.

Ghostly flying
Ghostly flying 'whirlpool' that appeared above Hawaii could be leftover SpaceX rocket fuel

Video footage shows a strange blue whirlpool flying over Hawaii, then breaking apart, shortly after a SpaceX rocket launch.

Coastal erosion: Climate group warns communities of cost
Coastal erosion: Climate group warns communities of cost

One Home compiles a map identifying 21 at-risk communities and warning of funding shortfalls.

Inquiry starts into Bristol green space development
Inquiry starts into Bristol green space development

Homes England wants to build 260 homes on Brislington Meadows.

GHGSat: Commercial satellite will see CO2 super-emitters
GHGSat: Commercial satellite will see CO2 super-emitters

Montreal firm GHGSat says its next Earth observer will track carbon dioxide at high resolution.

Essex County Council trials booking system at recycling centres
Essex County Council trials booking system at recycling centres

The authority says it is introducing time slots in a big to reduce waiting times and congestion.

Obesity can cause similar brain changes as Alzheimer
Obesity can cause similar brain changes as Alzheimer's, new study shows. Does losing weight help?

Being overweight in midlife has been linked to greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia, and a new study shows that brain changes in obese ...


Smart cladding could control whether buildings retain or emit heat

A new material changes its infrared colour when a small electric current is applied, raising the possibility of buildings that store or release heat depending on outside temperatures

Neolithic complex dubbed ‘Stonehenge of the North’ opens to UK public

Two sections of the Thornborough Henges near Ripon, UK, have been donated to the public body Historic England in an effort to preserve the millennia-old monuments

Sperm-sorting device aims to find healthy samples to boost IVF success

Healthier sperm are normally selected for IVF using a centrifuge, which can damage the cells, but an alternative method can do the job gently by creating a current for them to swim against

US megadrought has led to more air pollution from power plants

The ongoing drought in the western US depleted reservoirs and reduced hydropower generation. Fossil fuel power plants filled the gap but that has led to increased air pollution

Flying robot echolocates like a bat to avoid banging into walls

A simple buzzer and some microphones help a drone to navigate and map out its surroundings, much like how a bat uses sound to see in the dark

Should we be worried about bird flu spreading to mammals?

Bird flu infections have been recorded in various mammals including foxes and mink, but it's unclear whether the virus can be transmitted from one mammal to another

US military plan to create huge autonomous drone swarms sparks concern

The AMASS project would involve thousands of drones, on the ground, in the air and in the water, working together in a "swarm of swarms" to overwhelm enemy defences

Google AI generates musical backing tracks to accompany singers

An artificial intelligence called SingSong can take a recording of a person singing and create a backing track for it with the appropriate rhythm, key and harmonies

Human neurons implanted into a rat's brain respond to flashing lights

Lab-grown neurons were transplanted into the brains of rats with damaged visual cortexes. After two months, the neurons responded when the rats saw flashing lights

Sunquakes may be caused by weird beams of electrons from solar flares

Mysterious ripples in the sun’s plasma have gone unexplained for decades, but they may be caused by strange beams of high-energy electrons fired inward by solar flares

Wormholes could magnify light by a factor of 100,000

Wormholes, which are strange hypothetical tunnels through space-time, could act as cosmic magnifying glasses for objects behind them

Entirely new type of ice made using extremely cold steel balls

A new type of ice called medium-density amorphous ice has the same density as liquid water, so studying it could help us understand water’s strange behaviour at low temperatures

Why the most important topic in physics could be statistical mechanics

Statistical mechanics helps relate the quantum world to objects that seem solid and not governed by the whims of observation, but there are still questions to be answered, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Putting solar panels in grazing fields is good for sheep

Sheep living in pastures with solar panels benefit from shade in hot weather and more nutritious grass – and they stop weeds from growing on the panels

Ancient Egyptians used exotic oils from distant lands to make mummies

A workshop used for mummification at Saqqara in Egypt contains remnants of the substances used to make mummies, revealing many came from southern Africa or South-East Asia

Tweets reveal hardware stores cause disgust but motels bring joy

A study of more than 1.5 million tweets over one year suggests that people in San Francisco feel disgusted when at hardware stores and Londoners are most joyful at motels

Neanderthals hunted enormous elephants that fed 100 people for a month

Analysis of cut marks on elephant bones suggests every scrap of meat and fat was removed from the big beasts

Vikings brought horses and dogs to England, cremated bones confirm

The first physical proof that Vikings brought horses and dogs to England has been unearthed

Antidepressants mostly can't treat chronic pain, despite wide use

Ongoing pain, such as chronic back or neck pain, is difficult to treat, so some doctors prescribe antidepressants. Now, a review of evidence says these drugs mostly don't work as a treatment

Hearing noise and moving our body helps us gauge the passing of time

People may be more aware of how much time has passed when they move their body and hear sounds during the event. This improved time perception may help to gauge the effectiveness of treatments for conditions like Parkinson's disease

Most of England's sewage systems are overwhelmed, finds analysis

Figures on sewage overflows into rivers and seas in England show that 80 per cent of wastewater systems are regularly working over capacity

Smart dairy farms are using AI scanners to monitor cows' health

Technology being trialled on UK farms collects daily data on cows’ weight, body condition and mobility, helping to identify individuals in need of treatment

Vine-like robot that 'grows' towards heat could put out fires

A vine-like segmented robot that is attracted to heat could be used to autonomously extinguish fires without the need for costly and complex electronics

San Francisco is getting cold feet about self-driving car tests

San Francisco officials have called for a slower, more considered expansion of the use of autonomous vehicles, which have blocked traffic and hampered emergency services

Doubling trees in European cities could prevent thousands of deaths

A modelling study of 93 European cities suggests that more than 2600 human heat-related deaths over just three months could have been prevented if these places increased their average tree coverage from 15 per cent to 30 per cent

DeepMind AI is as fast as humans at solving previously unseen tasks

Artificial intelligences need specific training to excel at a task, but now a more generally intelligent one from DeepMind has performed as well as humans in a virtual world test

Only eating between 7am and 3pm helps people with obesity lose weight

Intermittent fasting led to a group of people with obesity losing 7.6 kilograms in 14 weeks when combined with them receiving advice on reducing their calorie intake, compared with 3.9 kilograms among those who only received the advice

Microplastics can be recycled to make electrodes for lithium batteries

The polyethylene microplastic pollution commonly found in wastewater can be extracted to create electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

Net-zero aviation needs up to $1 trillion in carbon offsets by 2050

Growing demand for air travel is counteracting the aviation industry push to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. Carbon offsets will be necessary – or fewer passengers

Animals that care for young may have more mutations and evolve faster

An experiment in beetles shows that when parents care for their young, the population accumulates more mutations over time, but this may have benefits

Dolphins that help humans catch fish are more likely to survive

Dolphins off coast of southern Brazil drive mullet towards the nets of local fishers and in return get some extra fish themselves

US proposes to ease blood donor restrictions on gay and bisexual men

The US Food and Drug Administration has proposed that blood donor assessments measure individual risk and do not exclude people based on their sexual orientation or gender

Galaxy clusters are smashing together to form 'flaming cosmic narwhal'

Six of the most powerful astronomical observatories have captured a stunning image of Abell 2256, which is made of multiple galaxy clusters smashing together

Doughnut-shaped laser used to create an optical fibre out of air

By shooting a brief and powerful laser beam shaped like a doughnut through the air, researchers created a 45-metre-long structure that could guide a light pulse like an optical fibre

Reports of Bigfoot rise when at least 900 black bears are in the area

Where black bears are abundant, Bigfoot sightings usually follow – which could make reports of the mythical creature a way to measure American black bear populations

US hospitals are facing critically low supplies of liquid ibuprofen

In response to a shortage of liquid ibuprofen, the US Food and Drug Administration is temporarily allowing manufacturers to produce and distribute non-FDA approved drugs for relieving fever and pain

Taxing sugary drinks may not cut obesity as much as headlines claim

A study finds the UK’s 2018 sugar tax prevented 5000 cases of obesity in school girls in England, but the picture is more murky than headlines suggest

‘Love hormone' may not be crucial for social bonding after all

Prairie voles still form social bonds without oxytocin sensors in the brain. The findings challenge the long-held belief that the hormone is a crucial part of the bonding process for all mammals

US childhood obesity guidelines may rush the use of drugs or surgery

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends intensive interventions to manage weight loss, including drugs and surgery – but it’s unclear whether they will reduce childhood obesity

Multicellular life may have begun with brief alliances between cells

Single-celled organisms called Stentor can feed more efficiently by pairing up, illustrating a possible stage in the evolution of complex life forms

Solar panel cleaning robot can be dropped off and picked up by drone

Dirty solar panels reduce global solar energy output as much as 5 per cent, but a start-up in Israel has tested drone delivery of a new autonomous robot to clean rooftop arrays

Two of the UK's water companies are still using dowsing to find leaks

Most UK water companies have dropped the scientifically discredited method of dowsing to find water leaks, but Thames Water and Severn Trent Water say they still use it

Bears may self-medicate against ticks by rubbing against trees

Black bears often scratch their backs on trees, leaving behind chemical signals to other bears. Now, it seems the act also helps protect them from ticks

We can reduce homelessness if we follow the science on what works

Decades of research have shown that focusing on housing, without making sobriety or mental health treatment a prerequisite, is the most effective way to reduce homelessness

Supernovae might be a good place to hunt for alien broadcasts

Other intelligent civilisations may send transmissions after a bright galactic event like a supernova to make them more visible to others, according to SETI researchers

AI has designed bacteria-killing proteins from scratch – and they work

An AI was tasked with creating proteins with anti-microbial properties. Researchers then created a subset of the proteins and found some did the job

‘Forbidden’ planet somehow escaped consumption by its dying host star

The planet 8 Ursae Minoris b should have been destroyed when its star became a red giant, but it continues to orbit strangely close to the star

Rare green comet C/2022 E3 is about to make its closest pass by Earth

A comet that last passed by Earth about 50,000 years ago is coming around again and will make its closest pass on 1 February, at which point it may be visible with the naked eye

Hormonal conditions like PCOS should no longer be neglected

Conditions like PCOS, endometriosis and PMS are notoriously hard to study, but recent advances in our understanding and in treatments are proving that is no longer the case

Metal robot can melt its way out of tight spaces to escape

A millimetre-sized robot made from a mix of liquid metal and microscopic magnetic pieces can stretch, move or melt. It could be used to fix electronics or remove objects from the body

Top News: Science