NATO Offers Trump a Budget Bonbon as Summit Nears




NATO Offers Trump a Budget Bonbon as Summit Nears
NATO Offers Trump a Budget Bonbon as Summit Nears  

BRUSSELS - In another gesture to President Donald Trump, NATO announced Thursday that it had agreed to reduce the United States' contribution to the alliance's relatively small central budget, a move aimed at ensuring a calm leaders' meeting next week in London.

The military alliance's own budget, which covers its headquarters and staff and some small joint military operations, is about $2.5 billion a year, compared with more than $700 billion for the Pentagon.

At a meeting with President Emmanuel Macron of France in Paris, the alliance's secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, said that its members had agreed to redistribute some costs.

"The U.S. will pay less, Germany will pay more, so now the U.S. and Germany will pay the same," he said, with each contributing about 16% of NATO's central budget. Previously the United States paid about 22%.

The changes become effective in 2021, according to a NATO diplomat.

The NATO budget is separate from the 2% of gross domestic product that each NATO member has agreed as their goal for military spending by 2024.

Trump regularly complains about military spending by other NATO members, but other countries in the alliance have increased their military spending since the Russian annexation of Crimea five years ago by about $130 billion, a NATO diplomat said, a figure that Stoltenberg is expected to announce next week.

Even so, only eight of the 29 member countries meet the 2% goal.

NATO leaders are trying to keep Trump from disrupting this meeting, a short one to celebrate the alliance's 70th anniversary, as he did the last Brussels summit in July 2018. Stoltenberg in particular has tried to keep close ties to the Trump administration, given the importance of the U.S. commitment to NATO.

At a news conference with Stoltenberg after their meeting in Paris, Macron defended his own criticism about NATO. The French leader, in an interview with the magazine The Economist, said that the alliance was approaching "brain death" because of a lack of coordination.

He was particularly irked that Trump had told President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey that he would pull U.S. troops out of Syria without having spoken to other NATO members.

"A wake-up call was necessary," Macron insisted after much criticism of his language. "I'm glad it was delivered, and I'm glad everyone now thinks we should rather think about our strategic goals."

Too much emphasis was put on military spending, Macron added, and not enough on strategy. France, a nuclear power, is among the NATO members not meeting the alliance's target for military spending.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

© 2019 The New York Times Company

COMMENTS

More Related News

Leading Homeland Security Under a President Who Embraces
Leading Homeland Security Under a President Who Embraces 'Hate-Filled' Talk

WASHINGTON -- Elaine C. Duke, then President Donald Trump's acting secretary of homeland security, arrived at the Roosevelt Room, down the hall from the Oval Office, on a steamy August afternoon in 2017 expecting a discussion about Trump's pledge to terminate DACA, the Obama-era protections for young immigrants. Instead, she said, it was "an ambush.""The room was stacked," she recalled. Stephen Miller, the architect of the president's assault on immigration, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and other White House officials demanded that she sign a memo ending the program, which they had already concluded was illegal. She did not disagree, but she chafed at being cut out of the real...

Trump wears mask while visiting wounded soldiers, medical workers at Walter Reed hospital
Trump wears mask while visiting wounded soldiers, medical workers at Walter Reed hospital

Trump, who has been criticized for not wearing a mask at public events, donned one while visiting wounded soldiers at Walter Reed hospital

Trump wears mask in public for first time during pandemic
Trump wears mask in public for first time during pandemic
  • World
  • 2020-07-11 21:43:35Z

President Donald Trump wore a mask during a visit to a military hospital on Saturday, the first time the president has been seen in public with the type of facial covering recommended by health officials as a precaution against spreading or becoming infected by the novel coronavirus. Trump flew by helicopter to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in suburban Washington to meet wounded servicemembers and health care providers caring for COVID-19 patients. As he left the White House, he told reporters: "When you're in a hospital, especially ... I think it's a great thing to wear a mask."

Romney, breaking with GOP, criticizes Trump for commuting Roger Stone
Romney, breaking with GOP, criticizes Trump for commuting Roger Stone's prison sentence

The Utah Senator was the first prominent voice in the Republican Party to publicly disavow the president's decision to erase Stone's prison sentence.

'Ashamed' Trump 2016 Voters Explain Why They're Ditching The President

Republicans who voted for Trump say they are "riddled with guilt" in the spot set to air on Fox News.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America