National Archives apologizes for blurring picture of anti-Trump Women's March signs




  • In Politics
  • 2020-01-18 20:08:32Z
  • By USA TODAY
 

The National Archives, which contains some of the country's founding documents like the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, apologized for blurring parts of an image from the 2017 Women's March critical of President Donald Trump.

"We apologize, and will immediately start a thorough review of our exhibit policies and procedures so that this does not happen again," the National Archives Twitter account wrote.

The Archives said the photo was "not an archival record" and was instead a photo used as a promotional graphic for an exhibit on women's suffrage.

The Women's March took place on Jan. 21, 2017, a day after Trump was inaugurated as president, and was in part a protest of Trump's past controversial statements about women.

The original photo, a wide shot of the March going down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. by Getty Images photographer Mario Tama, was the promotional display for an exhibit on women's suffrage. According to a photo comparison published by the Washington Post, the version of the photo on display in the National Archives had blurred out the anti-Trump slogans of some of the signs, as well as references to female genitalia.

The controversy erupted on the same day as the latest Women's March attracted thousands in the nation's capital.

More: 'The decade that ushers in new freedom': Women's March draws thousands across US

The editing of the image was heavily criticized on social media.

Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, slammed the editing as "Soviet-style censorship and silencing of voices of dissent."

The ACLU Twitter account called it an attempt to "airbrush history."

"Info integrity is at stake," said historian Karin Wulf.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Women's March: National Archives apologizes for blurring anti-Trump signs

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