NASA pulls all-female spacewalk due to suit fitting issues




  • In Science
  • 2019-03-26 00:10:06Z
  • By Johnny Lieu
 

You're just going to have to wait a little longer for an all-female spacewalk.

NASA astronauts Christina Koch and Anne McClain were scheduled to walk together in the historic moment, but NASA has pulled the event due to suit availability on the International Space Station.

SEE ALSO: NASA photos capture immense flooding of a vital U.S. Air Force base

Fellow NASA astronaut Nick Hague completed the first of the series of spacewalks last Friday with McClain, who found out that a particular suit size fit her best. Unfortunately, there'll only be one suit available in this size - and it also fits Koch.

Because of that issue, mission managers decided Hague will be sent out instead of McClain, and will join Koch on the second spacewalk this Friday.

"McClain learned during her first spacewalk that a medium-size hard upper torso - essentially the shirt of the spacesuit - fits her best," NASA said in a statement online. "Because only one medium-size torso can be made ready by Friday, Mar. 29, Koch will wear it."

On their spacewalk, Hague and Koch are tasked with replacing older, nickel-hydrogen batteries, with lithium-ion versions for one pair of the station's solar arrays.

It's a continuation of the work performed on the first spacewalk, and the battery upgrades are set to be performed over the next couple of years.

McClain's next spacewalk will instead take place on Apr. 8, where she'll be sent out with Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques.

They'll lay out cables to provide power to a Canadian-built robotic arm, Canadarm2, as well as installing cables to help expand wireless communications outside of the ISS.

Friday's spacewalk is expected to take 6.5 hours, and you can catch it live on NASA's website.

COMMENTS

More Related News

'Moon Rock Hunter' on quest to track down Apollo gifts

After Neil Armstrong took a "giant leap for mankind" on the Moon nearly 50 years ago and collected rocks and soil along the way, Richard Nixon presented lunar souvenirs to every nation -- 135, at the time. Dozens of the "goodwill" moon rocks -- some only the size of a grain of rice, others as big as a marble -- have since gone missing, and Joseph Gutheinz Jr is on a mission to find them. "Some people go rock hunting," Gutheinz said in an interview with AFP at his law office in a Houston suburb decorated with awards from NASA and the US military.

Apollo moon rocks help transform understanding of the universe
Apollo moon rocks help transform understanding of the universe

What is certain is that the lunar samples first gathered by Apollo 11's Neil Armstrong nearly 50 years ago have helped transform our understanding of the cosmos. Apollo astronauts collected 842 pounds (382 kilograms) of rocks and soil during their six missions to the Moon between 1969 and 1972 and brought it all back to Earth.

NASA Helps Plug a Hole in Maxar's Budget
NASA Helps Plug a Hole in Maxar's Budget

With friends like these, does even a pessimistic investor dare risk shorting Maxar stock?

Womankind
Womankind's giant leap: who will be the first female moonwalker?

More than fifty years after the end of the Apollo program, NASA plans to return to the Moon by 2024 as a "proving ground" to test the next generation of spacecraft ahead of an eventual crewed mission to Mars. No one knows for sure, but it's a likely bet the candidate will be selected from among NASA's current roster of 12 female astronauts. Predicting who will join Neil Armstrong in the annals of history isn't an exact science, but several former astronauts and experts interviewed by AFP say the proximity of the deadline mean it probably won't be a new recruit.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Science

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.