More GOP who voted in primary feel more allegiance to Trump than to party




More GOP who voted in primary feel more allegiance to Trump than to party
More GOP who voted in primary feel more allegiance to Trump than to party  

In addition to interviewing Democratic primary voters leaving the polls in New Hampshire on Tuesday, CBS News polled Republicans, too.

As expected, President Trump overwhelmingly won the Republican primary, and those who came out to vote were strong supporters.

Trump vs. the Republican Party

Support for the president among New Hampshire Republican primary voters runs deep. When they were asked whether they feel more allegiance to the Republican Party or to Donald Trump, a majority (55%) picked Trump. Even among those who said they feel more allegiance to the Republican Party, most of them - more than 7 in 10 - voted for Mr. Trump.

The president did get somewhat less support among Republican primary voters who said they didn't support him for the nomination in 2016, but most (62%) of that group cast their vote for him as well.

While the Democratic and Republican primary contests were different in nature (one competitive, one largely not), here's a look at the diverging views held by New Hampshire Democratic and Republican primary voters as they left the polls.

Views of the Trump administration

There is little middle ground when it comes to overall feelings about the Trump administration. Most New Hampshire Democratic primary voters expressed anger toward the administration, while most Republicans expressed enthusiasm.

The few who felt dissatisfied or angry about the Trump administration did not vote for the president on Tuesday; most backed former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld. This small group that was dissatisfied or angry represented just one in 10 Republican primary voters.

Personal finances and the economy

On the economic front, New Hampshire Republicans were more positive than Democrats about their own family's financial situation. The number of New Hampshire Republicans who said they are getting ahead financially (42%) more than doubled since 2016 (19%). This percentage increased among Democrats, too, but by just six points, to 21%.

Looking at voters across each party, those without a college degree were a bit less positive about their finances than those with a college degree, although not overwhelmingly so.

The impact of impeachment

New Hampshire Republican and Democratic primary voters see the impact of impeachment on the president's reelection chances differently. Most Republicans said it has helped Mr. Trump's reelection chances. Most Democrats disagree, but they don't widely see impeachment as something that has hurt the president politically - 6 in 10 said his impeachment hasn't made a difference regarding his reelection chances. Just under a quarter said it has hurt his chances.

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