Mexican president urges Pelosi to get USMCA trade deal approved




Mexican president urges Pelosi to get USMCA trade deal approved
Mexican president urges Pelosi to get USMCA trade deal approved  

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Friday he had sent a letter to U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urging her to work toward the approval of a new North American trade deal between the United States, Mexico and Canada.

Speaking at a regular news conference, Lopez Obrador said he was encouraged that U.S. Democratic lawmakers were concerned about the working conditions of Mexican workers following a visit by a U.S. congressional delegation to Mexico this week.

"There's agreement, and I took the opportunity to send Mrs Pelosi a letter explaining that it's in the interest of the three peoples, the three nations, that this deal is approved," he said, referring to the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).


(Reporting by Dave Graham; Editing by Hugh Lawson)

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