Man who served in U.S. Army Reserves accused of being agent for China




  • In US
  • 2018-09-25 22:07:45Z
  • By By Sarah N. Lynch

By Sarah N. Lynch

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Chinese citizen was arrested in Chicago on Tuesday on charges that he covertly worked for a high-ranking Chinese intelligence official to help try and recruit engineers and scientists, including some who worked as U.S. defense contractors, the Justice Department said.

Ji Chaoqun, 27, first came to the United States in 2013 to study electrical engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology, and in 2016 enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserves.

He was appearing in a federal courthouse in Chicago on one count of acting as an agent for the Chinese government.

Laura Hoey, who is representing Ji in the case, could not immediately be reached for comment.

According to the criminal complaint, Ji arrived in the United States from Beijing in August of 2013 on an F1 student visa, and went on to earn a Master's Degree in electrical engineering in 2015.

Text messages reviewed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation showed that in November 2013, Ji was introduced to an intelligence officer from the Jiangsu Province Ministry of State Security, referred to in the complaint as "Intelligence Officer A," by another person only identified as "Intelligence Officer B."

They later met on several occasions in China, and initially the intelligence official told Ji he was a college professor, according to the complaint and affidavit filed by the FBI.

However, the FBI said, Ji eventually learned the person's true identity and knew he was an officer in the Jiangsu Province Ministry of State Security, which is a provincial department of the Ministry of State Security.

A search warrant executed on an email account in 2015 later showed Ji had sent files to Intelligence Officer A containing information about eight different people based in the United States. The eight people were all naturalized citizens from Taiwan or China now living in the United States.

The Justice Department said all of them work for, or had retired from, jobs in the science and technology sectors, and that seven of the eight work or had worked for U.S. defense contractors.


(Reporting by Sarah N. Lynch; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

COMMENTS

More Related News

U.S., Taliban aim to firm up date for foreign force exit from Afghanistan
U.S., Taliban aim to firm up date for foreign force exit from Afghanistan
  • US
  • 2019-06-24 11:01:19Z

Upcoming peace talks between the United States and the Taliban will focus on working out a timeline for the withdrawal of U.S.-led troops from Afghanistan and on a Taliban guarantee militants won't plot attacks from Afghan soil, sources said on Monday. A seventh round of talks between the warring sides begins on Saturday in Qatar's capital of Doha, where U.S. and Taliban negotiators have been trying to hammer out a deal to end to the 18-year-long war since October. "Once the timetable for foreign force withdrawal is announced, then talks will automatically enter the next stage," said Sohail Shaheen, a spokesman for the Taliban's political office in Doha.

Filling Iran oil gap in India: U.S. supplies outshine Middle East crude
Filling Iran oil gap in India: U.S. supplies outshine Middle East crude

A surge in India's oil imports from the United States outpaced growth in shipments from its traditional suppliers in the Middle East, after Washington imposed sanctions on Tehran in November, according to tanker arrival data obtained from sources. U.S. President Donald Trump's administration renewed sanctions against Iran last year over its nuclear programme, although some buyers were allowed to continue taking limited volumes of Iranian oil under a six-month waiver. In May, the United States ended those exemptions and said countries that continued to buy Iranian oil would face sanctions, but India buyers had already begun shifting some of their sourcing away from the Middle East.

Trump learns it
Trump learns it's not always easy going it alone

The president's unilateral actions on Iran, North Korea and China have often left him forging ahead alone on several critical foreign policy issues.

Forget China - it
Forget China - it's America's own economic system that's broken

US weakness is inbuilt - the big 500 companies owe loyalty only to themselves and the public is shut out from prosperityA trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Photograph: Richard Drew/APXi Jinping might possibly agree next weekend on further steps to bring down China's trade imbalance with the US, giving Donald Trump a face-saving way of ending his trade war.But Xi won't agree to change China's economic system. Why should he?The American economic system is focused on maximizing shareholder returns. And it's achieving that goal: on Friday, the S&P 500 notched a new all-time high.But average Americans have seen no significant gains in their incomes for four decades,...

US blacklists 5 Chinese groups working in supercomputing
US blacklists 5 Chinese groups working in supercomputing

The United States is blacklisting five Chinese organizations involved in supercomputing, calling them national security threats and cutting them off from critical U.S. technology. The move Friday by the U.S. Commerce Department could complicate talks next week between President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, aimed at de-escalating a trade dispute between the world's two biggest economies. Commerce is putting five Chinese organizations, including supercomputer maker Sugon, on its so-called Entity List, saying their activities are "contrary to the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States." The other four are the Wuxi Jiangnan Institute of...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.