Lindsey Graham Suggests GOP Should Confirm Kavanaugh Quickly Before Midterm Elections




Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Wednesday argued that the Senate Judiciary
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Wednesday argued that the Senate Judiciary  

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Wednesday argued that the Senate Judiciary Committee should proceed "as soon as possible" with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation, saying that a longer process would be "not about finding the truth, but delaying the process till after the midterm elections."

His comments hint at a concern of many Republicans: that they need to confirm Kavanaugh quickly in case the GOP loses its chance if Democrats take back control of the Senate in November's election.

Graham tweeted that the committee should not honor the request of Christine Blasey Ford, who goes by Christine Blasey professionally, that the FBI investigate her sexual assault allegation against Kavanaugh before she testifies.

Of course, delaying a Supreme Court nomination until after an election isn't anything new. Just ask Republicans, who in 2016 tabled the confirmation process of Merrick Garland, President Barack Obama's Supreme Court pick, arguing that the American people needed to have a say via their presidential vote.

Garland never even had a chance. Republicans held the seat open for almost a year - until President Donald Trump took office, after which they quickly confirmed Justice Neil Gorsuch.

With Kavanaugh's confirmation, Republicans seem poised to proceed as planned, having scheduled a hearing for next Monday.

Attorneys for Blasey have said she is willing to testify before the Senate about the incident, in which she alleges Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a party when they were in high school. But on Tuesday night, they said she wants the FBI to conduct an investigation before her testimony.

Several Republican committee members, all of whom are male, have suggested the investigation is unnecessary. Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) is among them.

"The invitation for Monday still stands," Grassley said in a statement Tuesday night. "Dr. Ford's testimony would reflect her personal knowledge and memory of events. Nothing the FBI or any other investigator does would have any bearing on what Dr. Ford tells the committee, so there is no reason for any further delay."

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