Kavanaugh Tells Senate He Won't Withdraw Nomination Over Sexual Assault Allegations




 

Brett Kavanaugh said that he "will not be intimidated into withdrawing" his nomination to the Supreme Court, according to a new letter he addressed to the Senate Judiciary Committee the day after a second sexual assault allegation against him emerged.

In the letter dated Monday, Kavanaugh emphasized that he has complied with the "exhaustive process," has answered more written queries than has been submitted to all previous nominees combined and has multiple witnesses who confirm his version of events.

"There is now a frenzy to come up with something - anything - that will block this process and a vote on my confirmation from occurring," he wrote, alluding to Democrats' demands that a full investigation into the two allegations take place before he and his accusers testify on the events and before they vote on his nomination.

"These are smears, pure and simple," he continued. "And they debase our public discourse. But they are also a threat to any man or woman who wishes to serve our country. Such grotesque and obvious character assassination - if allowed to succeed - will dissuade competent and good people of all political persuasions from service."

Kavanaugh stands accused of sexual assault by two women: Christine Blasey Ford, who said she feared Kavanaugh "might inadvertently kill" her as he held her down and groped her during a party when they were both in high school in the early 1980s; and Deborah Ramirez, who came forward Sunday with allegations that Kavanaugh exposed himself to her and thrust his penis in her face during a party when they were students at Yale University.

Kavanaugh will get a chance to defend himself against the allegations on Thursday during another round of questioning before the Senate committee.

The same day Kavanaugh sent the letter, his accusers' supporters engaged in a national walkout, wore black and congregated in public spaces.

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