Kavanaugh says he might have been 'too emotional' in testimony: WSJ




  • In Politics
  • 2018-10-05 00:06:27Z
  • By Reuters
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh becomes emotional testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh becomes emotional testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington  

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh said in Wall Street Journal op-ed on Thursday that he "might have been too emotional at times" in his Senate testimony last week in which he denied accusations of sexual misconduct.

Kavanaugh wrote in the opinion piece that his testimony "reflected my overwhelming frustration at being wrongly accused." Kavanaugh's chances of confirmation by the Senate gained momentum on Thursday after two wavering lawmakers responded positively to an FBI report on accusations of sexual misconduct against the judge.

(Reporting by Eric Beech)

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